Magazine August 2, 2021, Issue

Christians Under Xi

Chinese President Xi Jinping waves next to Premier Li Keqiang and former president Hu Jintao at the end of the event marking the 100th founding anniversary of the Communist Party of China, on Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China, July 1, 2021. (Carlos Garcia/Reuters)
Their plight has lately worsened

China’s Christians, at 100 million strong and constituting that country’s largest religious minority, are facing a new government policy of severe religious repression and persecution. The modicum of toleration that, for two generations, allowed the development of a robust, evangelizing Chinese church no longer exists. In the past three years, the government has launched a systematic campaign to cut China’s Christian demographic drastically and control whatever survives within a little “birdcage,” as Hong Kong’s Cardinal Joseph Zen describes the push by the Chinese Communist Party for ideological conformity.

Tactics, aimed principally at church leadership but including ordinary Christians, range from prison

This article appears as “Christians under Xi” in the August 2, 2021, print edition of National Review.

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In This Issue

Introduction

Geopolitics

Economic Competition

Human Rights

Books, Arts & Manners

Sections

The Week

The Week

The geopolitical, economic, and ideological competition between the U.S. and China is now out in the open.

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