Media Blog

Dishwashers for Clinton

You’d think the Clinton campaign would know that they, of all people, can’t afford to look “slippery.”
Below are extracts from today’s Washington Post editorial. If Hillary can’t do better than this, many left and center voters may join the right in concluding that the Clintons are just too unethical to return to the White House.
The Washington Post writes:

DONORS WHOSE addresses turn out to be tenements. Dishwashers and waiters who write $1,000 checks. Immigrants who ante up because they have been instructed to by powerful neighborhood associations, or, as one said, “They informed us to go, so I went.” Others who say they never made the contributions listed in their names or who were not eligible to give because they are not legal residents of the United States. This is the disturbingly familiar picture of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential campaign presented last week in a report by the Los Angeles Times about questionable fundraising by the New York senator in New York City’s Chinese community. Out of 150 donors examined, one-third “could not be found using property, telephone or business records,” the Times reported. “Most have not registered to vote, according to public records.”
This appears to be another instance in which a Clinton campaign’s zeal for campaign cash overwhelms its judgment… As the Los Angeles Times reported, a single Chinatown fundraiser in April brought in $380,000. By contrast, 2004 Democratic presidential nominee John F. Kerry raised $24,000 from Chinatown in the course of his entire campaign.

Tom Gross — Tom Gross is a former Middle East correspondent for the London Sunday Telegraph and the New York Daily News.

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