Media Blog

Mitt Romney on Immigration: Google is Not Your Amigo

I know 2004 is such a long time ago, but let’s go to the Google and ver lo que podemos ver, Via FactCheck.org:

In 2004, the Boston Globe reported that Romney was reluctant to veto the tuition proposal – and not at all the certain, sure-footed decision maker portrayed in the ad. At the time, Romney said: Romney (June 2004): I hate the idea of in any way making it more difficult for kids, even those who are illegal aliens, to afford college in our state. But equally, perhaps a little more than equally, I do not want to create an incentive to do something which is illegal.

That’s the same position as Perry.

More from FactCheck.org, on Romney ordering the Massachusetts State Police to enforce immigration laws.

Romney puffs up his record.

Summary

Mitt Romney casts himself as tough on illegal immigration in a new ad in which he says that, as Massachusetts governor, “I authorized the State Police to enforce immigration laws.” He doesn’t mention that his order never took effect. It came in the closing days of his administration and was rescinded by his successor, as we wrote back in August.

He also promises, “As president, I’ll . . . cut funding for sanctuary cities.” Maybe so, but as governor he took no action against several such towns in his state.

We find Romney misleading on both counts.

Analysis

Romney’s ad began airing Nov. 1 and has run in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Cops on the Case

Romney claims he put state troopers on the trail of illegals in his state.

Romney: As governor, I authorized the state police to enforce immigration laws.

Well, yes. But, as we noted in August, he didn’t do so until he had less than a month left in his term.  He was already considering running for president, and the new governor-elect was expected to rescind the arrangement.

Romney began talking about giving troopers the power to make arrests on immigration charges earlier in 2006, but he didn’t sign an agreement with the federal government – a necessary condition for that authority to be granted –  until Dec. 13 of that year. Romney was scheduled to leave office Jan. 4, 2007.  Democrat Deval Patrick, who had won the race to succeed Romney, had already said the program was a “bad idea” because troopers were busy enough as it was.

Sure enough, Patrick rescinded the agreement within his first week in office so troopers could “focus on enforcing Massachusetts laws.” The policy never had a chance to take effect, because those troopers chosen to carry it out hadn’t yet begun a required six-week training course.

Wow. Churchillian leadership on the immigration front.

If you want to get serious about ending illegal immigration, simply make hiring an illegal immigrant a felony punishable by jail time. Problem solved.

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