Media Blog

The Power of Drudge

Saturday’s LA Times has a good piece on Matt Drudge and the shift in the MSM to embrace his website. An excerpt:

Although Drudge was promptly denounced as a right-wing lackey with no journalistic standards or standing, his pursuit of the scandal forced the traditional media to jump on the story, too. With a few flicks of his fingers, Drudge had demonstrated the power the Web can bestow upon a lone voice determined to be heard.
Since then, the Internet has emerged as the medium of choice for hard-core news consumers, who increasingly rely on bloggers and aggregators like Drudge to supply links that guide them through the thicket. By getting into the game early and becoming arguably the most recognizable personality online, Drudge was positioned perfectly to capitalize on the behavior of today’s audience.
“Obviously, for some journalists, there’s a lot of irony that Matt Drudge was a black-hat villain, and now a lot of those same journalists realize that getting a link on his website is crucial to their stories getting wider attention,” says Jim Brady, executive editor of washingtonpost.com. “That’s the way the Web works. We’re all trying to make sure our journalism is discovered.”

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