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Smearing Gov. Brewer

The Left is in full-tizzy mode, thinking they’ve caught Gov. Jan Brewer of Arizona — in the words of Markos Moulitsas — in a lie:

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer is so upset that some have invoked Godwin’s Law when discussing her state’s new Latino ethnic cleansing law.

“The Nazi comments . . . they are awful,” she said, her voice dropping. “Knowing that my father died fighting the Nazi regime in Germany, that I lost him when I was 11 because of that . . . and then to have them call me Hitler’s daughter. It hurts. It’s ugliness beyond anything I’ve ever experienced.”

Compelling! Except that she’s pulling a Mark Kirk.

Gov. Jan Brewer said in a recent interview that her father died fighting Nazis in Germany. In fact, the death of Wilford Drinkwine came 10 years after World War II had ended.

During the war, Drinkwine worked as a civilian supervisor for a naval munitions depot in Hawthorne, Nev. He died of lung disease in 1955 in California.

Brewer made the comment to The Arizona Republic while talking about the criticism she has taken since signing SB 1070, the new immigration law that makes it a state crime to be in the country illegally.

“Knowing that my father died fighting the Nazi regime in Germany, that I lost him when I was 11 because of that… and then to have them call me Hitler’s daughter. It hurts. It’s ugliness beyond anything I’ve ever experienced,” Brewer said in the story, published Tuesday.

Officials with the governor’s administration said her statement should not be taken to mean that she was claiming her father was a soldier in Germany during the Nazi regime.

Ah yes, claiming her father died fighting Nazis in Germany should, in no way, be construed as implying that her father died fighting Nazis in Germany.

Hardly. Here’s a New York Daily News piece from April 27 (which is actually a negative piece on the governor):

Wilford, as his family called him, married Edna Bakken. The couple had a young son, and remained in Minnesota until the outbreak of World War II.

“Wilford Drinkwine believed his country needed him,” Brewer said in a speech a month ago. “He moved his young son and his wife, Edna, halfway across America for a job in the Nevada desert. I was born a couple of years later.”

The future governor was 11 when her father succumbed to lung disease from prolonged exposure to munitions chemicals. The mother opened a dress shop and worked 10 hours a day, seven days a week.

“I worked right beside her every day after school and on weekends,” Brewer recalled.

In one of those miracles of hard-earned opportunity that comprise America, the widow’s daughter grew up to become the Arizona secretary of state and a delegate to the 2004 Republican National Convention in New York.

Keep digging Left, because there’s nothing here.

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