News

Law & the Courts

Avenatti: ‘Not Our Obligation’ to Produce Evidence Now

Stormy Daniels’ lawyer, Michael Avenatti, on CBS This Morning. (CBS via YouTube)

Michale Avenatti said Thursday on CNN that he was not obligated at this time to produce evidence substantiating his client’s allegation that Brett Kavanaugh routinely sexually assaulted girls at high school parties and was “present” when she was gang raped.

“We are not laying out all of the facts and all the evidence right now. That’s not our obligation,” Avenatti told CNN’s Alisyn Camerota.

Avenatti, who gained notoriety representing porn star Stormy Daniels in her lawsuit against president Trump, released Wednesday a sworn statement made by his client, Julie Swetnick, accusing Kavanaugh of touching and “grinding” against girls without their consent.

Swetnick further alleged that she and Kavanaugh frequently attended house parties where gang rapes occurred and, while she didn’t witness the Supreme Court nominee commit such an act, she claims to have seen him waiting on line outside a room where she believed an assault was taking place.

Senate Judiciary Committee staff first reached out to Avenatti on Sunday minutes after he tweeted the then-anonymous allegations. They have since tried on six occasions to follow up with him, asking that he make his client available for an interview and provide any evidence he may have to support her claims. Avenatti has not addressed those requests, instead repeatedly asking for the Senate to request an FBI probe into the allegations and to subpoena the testimony of Kavanaugh’s friend, Mark Judge, who his client claims can speak to his behavior at the parties in question.

Kavanaugh and his first accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, are scheduled to testify publicly before the Judiciary Committee Thursday morning. Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote is scheduled for Friday morning.

Jack Crowe — Jack Crowe is a news writer at National Review Online.

Most Popular

Law & the Courts

Rosenstein Defends the Mueller Probe

Well, did you think Rod Rosenstein was going to say, “You got me. The Mueller probe was inappropriate and politicized?” No, you didn’t. And the deputy attorney general did not disappoint. In an interview with the Wall Street Journal on Wednesday, Rosenstein defended the investigation as “appropriate ... Read More
Culture

The Witches of Bushwick

In Brooklyn, there is an occult bookshop called Catland Books. “Catland” is, one imagines, an apt description of the homes of the women who congregate there. The operators of the establishment have announced that they are planning to hold a special hex session this weekend to make Supreme Court justice ... Read More
Politics & Policy

The Blackface Party

I must have missed something: Was there some kind of all-hands white-people meeting at which we voted to kick the Democrats out? Elizabeth Warren, Rachel Dolezal, Beto O’Rourke — what’s up with all the ethnic play-acting? Isn’t cultural appropriation supposed to be a bad thing among progressives? Isn’t ... Read More
Film & TV

A Right-Wing Halloween

‘The world is not a dark and evil place,” insists an exasperated woman played by Judy Greer in Halloween. “It’s full of love and understanding!” I put the question to the class: Is she right? In the new film (not a reboot but a sequel that occurs 40 years after the events in the 1978 original and ... Read More