News

U.S.

Bail for Derek Chauvin Set at $1.25 Million

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin poses for an undated booking photograph taken after he was transferred to a Minnesota Department of Corrections state facility, June 2, 2020. (Minnesota Department of Corrections/via Reuters)

Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who faces a second-degree murder charge for the death of George Floyd, was given a $1.25 million bail at a Monday hearing.

Chauvin’s bail could be $1 million if he meets certain conditions, Hennepin County Judge Denise Reilly ruled. Chauvin, making his first court appearance virtually since being arrested and charged, did not enter a plea in the brief hearing — under Minnesota law, no plea is entered in the first appearance on a complaint. His next court appearance was set for June 29.

Minnesota attorney general Keith Ellison, who has been appointed by Minnesota governor Tim Walz to lead the case against Chauvin, decided to upgrade the murder charge against the former cop from third-degree to second-degree without intent, as well as second-degree manslaughter.

Ellison also charged Chauvin’s former colleagues — J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane, and Tou Thao — as accomplices in the case. Kueng, Lane, and Thao are each charged with one count of aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

The official autopsy by the county medical examiner found that Floyd’s death was caused by cardiac arrest as police restrained him and Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck for nearly 10 minutes. The report also revealed fentanyl intoxication and recent methamphetamine use in Floyd’s system, but did not list the use of those substances as the cause of death.

 

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Most Popular

Trump: Yes

Editor’s Note: The following is one of three essays, each from a different perspective, in the latest edition of National Review on the question of whether to vote for President Trump. The views below reflect those of the individual author, not of the NR editorial board as a whole. The other two essays can be ... Read More

Trump: Yes

Editor’s Note: The following is one of three essays, each from a different perspective, in the latest edition of National Review on the question of whether to vote for President Trump. The views below reflect those of the individual author, not of the NR editorial board as a whole. The other two essays can be ... Read More
Media

The Hunter Emails

According to a 2015 email, then–vice president Joe Biden met with a top executive at Burisma, the Ukrainian energy firm that paid Biden’s son, Hunter, $50,000 a month to sit on its board. Earlier, the Burisma executive had asked Hunter to use his influence to quell Ukrainian government officials who were ... Read More
Media

The Hunter Emails

According to a 2015 email, then–vice president Joe Biden met with a top executive at Burisma, the Ukrainian energy firm that paid Biden’s son, Hunter, $50,000 a month to sit on its board. Earlier, the Burisma executive had asked Hunter to use his influence to quell Ukrainian government officials who were ... Read More
Elections

How the GOP Can Win Over Millennials

Joel Kotkin, the Presidential Fellow of Urban Futures at Chapman University in Orange, Calif., has written extensively on demographics, housing, and issues related to income inequality in the 21st century. Kotkin often blends research on demographics with historical reasoning, and he has chronicled the decline of ... Read More
Elections

How the GOP Can Win Over Millennials

Joel Kotkin, the Presidential Fellow of Urban Futures at Chapman University in Orange, Calif., has written extensively on demographics, housing, and issues related to income inequality in the 21st century. Kotkin often blends research on demographics with historical reasoning, and he has chronicled the decline of ... Read More