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British Politicians Call Trump’s Comments on Terrorism and Brexit ‘Repulsive’

President Trump and Prime Minister May at the White House in January. (Reuters photo: Kevin Lamarque)

British politicians had strong words for President Trump after he gave an interview to a British newspaper criticizing Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit strategy and accusing London Mayor Sadiq Khan of not being tough enough on terrorism.

Labor member of Parliament Anna Turley called the president “racist” for his remarks on Britain’s immigration policies and questioned why Britain should respect Trump when he does not respect the London mayor.

Two other Labour MPs, Ben Bradshaw and Darren Jones, called it a “humiliating” moment for the United Kingdom.

“Our prime minister is so weak she still rolls out the red carpet for a man who does nothing but insult her,” Bradshaw wrote.

On the other side of British politics, Conservative MP Sarah Wollaston said the president’s “divisive, dog-whistle rhetoric” is “repulsive.”

“If signing up to the Trump world view is the price of a deal, it’s not worth paying,” she added.

Their comments came after an explosive and exclusive interview Trump gave to The Sun in which he cast doubt on a future trade deal with the UK if it follows through on its current softer plan for Brexit.

“I would have done it much differently,” the president said of May’s current Brexit plan. “I actually told Theresa May how to do it, but she didn’t listen to me.”

“If they do a deal like that, we would be dealing with the European Union instead of dealing with the UK, so it will probably kill the deal,” he stated.

He criticized the London mayor for doing a “very bad job” on terrorism, and said “allowing millions and millions of people to come into Europe is very, very sad.”

“I think you are losing your culture,” he added.

London experienced at least five terror attacks in 2017 that together injured dozens of people and killed at least 13.

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