News

Politics & Policy

Chip Roy Reminds Trump of His Promise Never to Sign Another Rushed Spending Bill

U.S. Congressman Chip Roy speaking with attendees at the 2019 Young Americans for Liberty Convention (Gage Skidmore/WikiMedia )

Representative Chip Roy (R., Texas) recalled on the House floor on Tuesday President Trump’s 2018 promise to never sign a rushed omnibus spending bill, as a $1.4 trillion spending package was scheduled for a House vote on the same day.

Roy plans to vote against the bill and complained that his vote would be used against him politically because of certain provisions he is refusing to approve.

“The President [in 2018]…said about a massive omnibus bill, ‘I will never sign another bill like this again,'” Roy said quoting Trump. “Mr. President, I look forward to your veto.”

White House spokeswoman Kellyanne Conway told reporters on Tuesday that Trump was expected to sign the bill.

“The president is poised to sign it to keep the government open,” Conway said. If Trump does not sign, the federal government will shut down.

In March 2018 President Trump eventually signed an omnibus spending bill after threatening a veto. Trump justified his decision by saying the money was needed to avoid jeopardizing U.S. military operations.

“As a matter of National Security I’ve signed the Omnibus Spending Bill,” Trump wrote on Twitter. “I say to Congress: I will NEVER sign another bill like this again.”

Representative Roy also criticized the current bill for continuing to fund the war in Afghanistan.

“And today — Republicans will vote to keep funding Afghanistan with nary a word about the Afghanistan papers or clarifying our mission,” Roy wrote on Twitter, referring to the documents obtained by the Washington Post showing U.S. officials consistently misrepresented their progress in the war in Afghanistan. “For this and other reasons I am a ‘no.'”

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Zachary Evans is a news writer for National Review Online. He is a veteran of the Israeli Defense Forces and a trained violist.

Most Popular

U.S.

The Chicago Gun Myth

The tragically incompetent mayor of Chicago, Lori Lightfoot, appeared on CNN’s State of the Union this weekend to deflect attention from the horror show unfolding in her city by blaming interlopers for its spiking murder rate: “We are being inundated with guns from states that have virtually no gun control, ... Read More
U.S.

The Chicago Gun Myth

The tragically incompetent mayor of Chicago, Lori Lightfoot, appeared on CNN’s State of the Union this weekend to deflect attention from the horror show unfolding in her city by blaming interlopers for its spiking murder rate: “We are being inundated with guns from states that have virtually no gun control, ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Barr-room Brawl

I’ll confess that I did not watch the entire Judiciary Committee hearing with Bill Barr; I’m grateful that Andy and Rich did the work for me. But I have seen enough of it to fully agree with their sentiments. It was a circus, full of gross process fouls, and everyone who is familiar at all with Congress knows ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Barr-room Brawl

I’ll confess that I did not watch the entire Judiciary Committee hearing with Bill Barr; I’m grateful that Andy and Rich did the work for me. But I have seen enough of it to fully agree with their sentiments. It was a circus, full of gross process fouls, and everyone who is familiar at all with Congress knows ... Read More
Culture

Our Summer of Cultural Suicide

Cultural suicide used to be a popular diagnosis of why things suddenly just quit. Historians such as Oswald Spengler and Arnold Toynbee cited social cannibalism to explain why once-successful states, institutions, and cultures simply died off. Their common explanation was that the arrogance of success ... Read More
Culture

Our Summer of Cultural Suicide

Cultural suicide used to be a popular diagnosis of why things suddenly just quit. Historians such as Oswald Spengler and Arnold Toynbee cited social cannibalism to explain why once-successful states, institutions, and cultures simply died off. Their common explanation was that the arrogance of success ... Read More