News

Elections

Doug Collins Says Trump Not Picking Sides in Georgia Senate Race: ‘He’s Staying Out of It’

Rep. Doug Collins speaks to the media as the impeachment trial of President Trump continues in Washington, D.C., January 27, 2020. (Joshua Roberts/Reuters)

Georgia congressman Doug Collins insisted that President Trump will be “staying out of” the state’s special-election race for Senate between Collins and the recently-appointed Senator Kelly Loeffler.

“He’s not getting in this race,” Collins told the Georgia Recorder last week. He added that Trump “respects the senator and her position and he knows me intimately.”

Trump praised both individuals for their support during a White House address following his acquittal vote on February 6.

“She’s been so supportive, and she’s been downright nasty and mean about the unfairness to the president,” Trump said of Loeffler. He then added that Collins was a ““man who has been an unbelievable friend of mine and spokesman — and somebody that I really like.”

The president also addressed the elephant in the room with the two running against each other for the seat vacated by the retired Senator Johnny Isakson.

“I know Kelly, you’re going to end up liking [Collins] a lot. Something’s going to happen that’s going to be very good, I don’t know. I haven’t figured it out yet,” Trump said.

In the buildup to the appointment of Loeffler by Georgia Republican governor Brian Kemp, Trump repeatedly asked that Kemp appoint Collins, the ranking Republican on the House Judiciary Committee and one of the president’s staunchest allies.

But Kemp ended up defying Trump’s wishes by appointing Loeffler, a multimillionaire businesswoman who immediately began promoting her support of the president amid impeachment.

Collin’s campaign announcement drew the ire of the National Republican Senate Committee and pro-Republican Senate Leadership Fund super Pac for deciding to run against Loeffler. The special election in November has no primaries and will include multiple candidates from both parties on the same ballot, with a potential runoff election set for January if no candidate wins a majority. The winner will see out the remainder of Isakson’s term.

But Collins brushed off the intra-party attacks, and said he expected to win the election.

“In November, we’re going to win our side and we’ll probably go into a runoff and next January you’ll visit me over on the Senate side,” he said.

Most Popular

U.S.

Some Good News Going into the Weekend

It’s Friday -- although I know it’s getting harder and harder to tell these days. You deserve a respite from yesterday’s gloom. (If you’re hungry for more gloom, there’s always the most recent edition of The Editors podcast -- and thank you, dear readers, for checking on me.) Today’s newsletter ... Read More
U.S.

Some Good News Going into the Weekend

It’s Friday -- although I know it’s getting harder and harder to tell these days. You deserve a respite from yesterday’s gloom. (If you’re hungry for more gloom, there’s always the most recent edition of The Editors podcast -- and thank you, dear readers, for checking on me.) Today’s newsletter ... Read More
Science & Tech

The 41 Worst People You Meet on Twitter

Twitter, even more so than blogs, offered us the revolutionary promise of a virtual town square: You could hear from and engage with people from many walks of life, the prominent and the ordinary, in real time. You could read news as it breaks, debate the great issues of the day, and have fun. That promise ... Read More
Science & Tech

The 41 Worst People You Meet on Twitter

Twitter, even more so than blogs, offered us the revolutionary promise of a virtual town square: You could hear from and engage with people from many walks of life, the prominent and the ordinary, in real time. You could read news as it breaks, debate the great issues of the day, and have fun. That promise ... Read More