News

Law & the Courts

Four Minneapolis Cops Fired over George Floyd Death

(Stock photo: artolympic/Getty Images)

Four Minneapolis police officers have been fired amid outrage over video footage showing an officer kneeling on the neck of a black man who died after being transported to the hospital in police custody.

Minneapolis police chief Medaria Arradondo announced the decision to fire the unnamed officers at a press conference Tuesday afternoon. Mayor Jacob Frey said he “100 percent” supported the decision.

Frey revealed the identity of the deceased as George Floyd, whom police arrested Monday night after he “physically resisted officers” upon exiting a vehicle while under the apparent influence of an intoxicant.

“Officers were able to get the suspect into handcuffs and realized that the suspect was suffering a medical distress,” a Minneapolis police spokesman said in a news briefing early Tuesday morning. “Officers called for an ambulance. He was transported to Hennepin County Medical Center, where he died a short time later.”

Video footage showed onlookers pleading with the officers to let Floyd breathe. A handcuffed Floyd eventually appeared to lose consciousness after several minutes, with the officer still kneeling on his neck.

The FBI will investigate the altercation as a potential civil-rights violation, after Arradondo said police had received “additional information” about the incident from a community source.

Minnesota senator Amy Klobuchar tweeted a statement decrying “yet another horrifying and gutwrenching instance of an African American man dying.” She also called for “a complete and thorough outside investigation into what occurred.”

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Most Popular

U.S.

A Look at the Reinfection Rate

On the menu today: unraveling those ominous claims that people can get reinfected with the coronavirus merely weeks or months after they think they’ve beaten it; the governor of Mississippi explains why he doesn’t think “herd immunity” is a realistic option, while some New York neighborhoods offer some ... Read More
U.S.

A Look at the Reinfection Rate

On the menu today: unraveling those ominous claims that people can get reinfected with the coronavirus merely weeks or months after they think they’ve beaten it; the governor of Mississippi explains why he doesn’t think “herd immunity” is a realistic option, while some New York neighborhoods offer some ... Read More
White House

Don’t Blame Fauci

The president’s relationship with Anthony Fauci, who directs the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and has played a very public role in the country’s COVID-19 response, has gotten especially rocky. Fauci has expressed concerns about reopening and bluntly contradicted some of the ... Read More
White House

Don’t Blame Fauci

The president’s relationship with Anthony Fauci, who directs the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and has played a very public role in the country’s COVID-19 response, has gotten especially rocky. Fauci has expressed concerns about reopening and bluntly contradicted some of the ... Read More
Media

Bari Weiss and the Malignancy at the New York Times

Bari Weiss resigned today from the New York Times, five weeks after the Times essentially forced out editorial page editor James Bennet for publishing an op-ed by Senator Tom Cotton. Bennet had hired Weiss, and his departure for allowing a U.S. Senator to advocate the use of longstanding presidential powers was a ... Read More
Media

Bari Weiss and the Malignancy at the New York Times

Bari Weiss resigned today from the New York Times, five weeks after the Times essentially forced out editorial page editor James Bennet for publishing an op-ed by Senator Tom Cotton. Bennet had hired Weiss, and his departure for allowing a U.S. Senator to advocate the use of longstanding presidential powers was a ... Read More