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Jimmy Kimmel Jokes about Cutting Kavanaugh’s Penis Off

Jimmy Kimmel in Los Angeles, Calif., March 7, 2018. (Mario Anzuoni/Reuters )

Comedian Jimmy Kimmel facetiously suggested during the Monday edition of his eponymous late-night show that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh should be confirmed and then publicly have his penis removed.

“I think there’s a compromise here. Hear me out on this,” Kimmel said on his ABC late night show, Jimmy Kimmel Live. “So, Kavanaugh gets confirmed to the Supreme Court. OK. Well, in return we get to cut that pesky penis of his off in front of everyone.”

Kimmel, the former host of the The Man Show, began the segment by mocking Kavanaugh’s claim to have been a virgin throughout high school “and for many years thereafter.”

“[Kavanaugh] claims that he kept calendars detailing his social engagements from 1982 that will help to exonerate him,” Kimmel said. “Okay. What 17-year-old keeps calendars of his social engagements? No wonder he was a virgin.”

Kavanaugh made the claim about his personal life during a Monday night interview on Fox News in which he repeated his denial of the sexual-assault allegations against him. He is scheduled to testify publicly before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday along side Christine Blasey Ford, the California psychology professor who accused him of pinning her down and trying to remove her clothes at a high-school party.

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