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March for Our Lives Founder Leaves Group, Regrets Trying to ‘Embarrass’ Rubio

Cameron Kasky at a March for Our Lives event in Washington, U.S. March 22, 2018 (Eric Thayer/Reuters)

A co-founder of March for Our Lives has left the group and said he regrets trying to “embarrass” Senator Marco Rubio at a town hall after the Parkland shooting that killed 17.

“I left the organization and if I thought that my friends and the people I worked with couldn’t do it without me I would not have done that,” high school student and shooting survivor Cameron Kasky told Fox News Radio on Wednesday.

“I’m very regretful of a lot of the mistakes that I’ve made along the way,” Kasky remarked.

He expressed particular remorse about how he addressed a question to Rubio at a CNN town hall just a week after a former student opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School  in Parkland, Florida.

“Sen. Rubio, it’s hard to look at you and not look down a barrel of an AR-15 and not look at Nikolas Cruz, but the point is you’re here and there are some people who are not,” Kasky told the Florida Republican at the time, also accusing the senator of being beholden to the National Rifle Association.

“I went into that wanting less conversation and more to embarrass Rubio and that was my biggest flaw,” he said. “I even name dropped the murderer, which at the time I never really thought about, but looking back it ticks me off so much when people do that because then you’re getting that person’s name out there and making them a celebrity.”

Kasky added that he also learned more about other political perspectives since starting the March for Our Lives.

“This summer when March For Our Lives went on the summer tour that we embarked on I met that person in Texas whose got that semi-automatic weapon because that’s how they like to protect their family,” he remembered. “I met the 50 some odd percent of woman who are pro-life, even though I thought it was preposterous that a woman could be pro-life and not pro-choice at the time.”

“I learned that a lot of our issues politically come from a lack of understanding of other perspectives,” the young activist remarked. “I’m working on some efforts to encourage bipartisanship or at least discussion that is productive and help a lot of people avoid the mistakes that I made.”

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