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Massie Will Force Roll Call Vote on $2.2 Trillion Coronavirus Stimulus Package

Congressman Thomas Massie speaking with attendees at the 2019 Young Americans for Liberty Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 13 April 2019 (Gage Skidmore/Wikimedia)

Representative Thomas Massie on Friday announced he will delay the $2.2 trillion coronavirus stimulus package by demanding a recorded vote requiring at least 216 members to appear on the floor.

Massie, a Kentucky Republican, said he plans to force a roll call vote on the bill, intended to buoy the flagging economy, rather than approving the legislation by unanimous consent.

“I swore an oath to uphold the constitution, and I take that oath seriously. In a few moments I will request a vote on the CARES Act which means members of Congress will vote on it by pushing ‘yes’ or ‘no’ or ‘present,'” Massie wrote in a tweet.

“Are they afraid of the truth?” the congressman added. “I’ve been told that they don’t even have 1 minute available for me to speak against this bill during the 4 hour debate. The fix is in. If this bill is so great for America, why not allow a vote on it? Why not have a real debate?”

Lawmakers rushed back to Washington, D.C. on Thursday after Massie indicated he may delay the bill.

President Trump lashed out at Massie earlier on Friday in a string of tweets, calling him a “third rate grandstander” and urging his party to “throw Massie out of Republican Party.”

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