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Elections

Poll: Democrats and Republicans Neck and Neck on Generic Midterm Ballot

(Jim Young/Reuters)

Democrats’ lead over Republicans on the generic midterms ballot slipped to within the margin of error this month, according to a new CNN poll.

With the midterm elections only six months away, voters are almost evenly split as to which party’s candidate they will support.

About 47 percent of registered voters plan to vote for the Democratic candidate in their district, and 44 percent will vote Republican.

Since February, Democrats’ lead in the generic congressional ballot dropped from 16 points to only 3, the poll found, which was conducted May 2 to May 5 by telephone.

Republicans have been on edge about predictions of a blue wave in November, especially after Democrats did better than expected in several special elections that should have been shoe-ins for Republicans.

Slightly less than a third of voters say the country would do better with a Democratic Congress, and one percent less than that say a Republican Congress would be better, the poll showed.

The remaining little more than a third of the country says it does not matter which party controls Congress.

Enthusiasm among Republican voters is up even since two months ago while dropping among Democrat voters, although Democrats still lead by double digits among enthusiastic voters.

Trump’s approval ratings remain at a modest 41 percent, but almost 6 in 10 say the country is doing well generally.

Support for or disapproval of the president’s policies has played a major role in shaping voters’ decisions on whom to vote for in November, with close to two-thirds of voters saying Trump is an extremely or very important factor in their congressional vote.

The 52 percent who said in January that they would back the candidate who opposes the president has waned to 48 percent.

Voters are happier lately with the president’s handling of the economy, immigration and foreign trade.

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