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McConnell Blocks Resolution Urging That Mueller Report Be Made Public

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Capitol Hill in 2015. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

Senator Mitch McConnell on Monday blocked a resolution that urged the Justice Department to publicly release Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s final report.

The Senate majority leader blocked a request by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer for unanimous consent on the nonbinding resolution.

“Whether or not you’re a supporter of President Trump or not, of what you feel, there is no good reason not to make the report public,” Schumer told his colleagues in a floor speech. “It’s a simple request for transparency. Nothing more, nothing less.”

McConnell argued that “the special counsel and the Justice Department ought to be allowed to finish their work in a professional manner.”

“To date the attorney general has followed through on his commitments to Congress,” McConnell said. “One of those commitments is that he intends to release as much information as possible.”

Mueller submitted his final report to Attorney General William Barr on Sunday, ending the two-year probe into the Trump campaign’s connections to Russia. The investigation “did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election,” according to the summary of the report Barr provided Congress.

Democrats, including most of the high-profile Democratic presidential candidates, have called on Barr to release the entire report to Congress and the public. Barr has said he will confer with Mueller and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to determine which parts of the report can be released legally.

Earlier this month, Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, a frequent Republican defender of Trump, blocked Schumer’s first request to pass the resolution, shortly after the measure passed the House 420 to 0.

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