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Multiple Apple Suppliers Accused of Using Forced Uyghur Labor

Customers walk past the new Apple store at Grand Central Station in New York, August 1, 2018. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters )

Seven suppliers for Apple allegedly use forced labor of minority groups in Xinjiang Province, according to an investigation by The Information and human rights groups.

The investigation used previously unreported video, photos, and comments by Chinese officials, as well as public reports in state-run media, to identify the suppliers that allegedly use forced labor. The suppliers named in the report are Advanced-Connectek, AcBel Polytech, Avary Holding, CN Innovations, Luxshare Precision Industry, Shenzhen Deren Electronic Co., and Suzhou Dongshan Precision Manufacturing Co.

While Apple does not list all of its supply-chain providers, the suppliers were found to be connected with Apple through public and internal documents and employee interviews conducted by The Information.

“Despite the restrictions of Covid-19, we undertook further investigations and found no evidence of forced labor anywhere we operate,” Apple told The Information in response to the allegations. “We will continue doing all we can to protect workers and ensure they are treated with dignity and respect.”

China runs a network of detention camps in Xinjiang to hold members of minority groups, primarily Uyghur Muslims. Many of those detainees are used in forced labor projects, including reportedly as part of the global medical goods and cotton supply chains.

Apple is among several companies that have lobbied the U.S. Senate regarding the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, which seeks to ban goods from Xinjiang unless customs inspectors can verify they weren’t made with forced labor. Other companies that have lobbied over the bill include Nike and Coca-Cola.

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Zachary Evans is a news writer for National Review Online. He is a veteran of the Israeli Defense Forces and a trained violist.

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