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Nashville Bomber’s Girlfriend Warned Police Last Year He Was Building Explosives

Law enforcement officers gather to investigate after a downtown Nashville explosion,Tennessee, December 26, 2020. (Harrison McClary/Reuters)

A woman claiming to be the girlfriend of the male suspect who set off the Christmas Day explosion in Nashville on Friday reported to police last year that he was building explosives in his recreational vehicle.

At about 6:30a.m. on Christmas morning last week, an RV belonging to Anthony Warner, 63, exploded in downtown Nashville on Second Avenue in front of an AT&T transmission building. The blast damaged dozens of buildings spanning the entire city block and blew out telecommunications systems in the Southeast for several days.

On August 21, 2019, Raymond Throckmorton, an attorney for Pamela Perry, the woman who said she was the girlfriend of bombing suspect Warner, called police and told them that Perry had made “suicidal threats to him via telephone.”

Police arrived at Perry’s home and found her sitting on the porch with two unloaded pistols nearby. She said the firearms belonged to Warner, who was “building bombs in the RV trailer at his residence,” according to documents from the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department obtained by CNN.

“She related that the guns belonged to a ‘Tony Warner’ and that she did not want them in the house any longer,” MNPD spokesman Don Aaron told The Tennessean.

Nashville police relayed Perry’s statements to the FBI.

The attorney, who had previously represented Warner in a civil case, also spoke with police and told them Warner “frequently talks about the military and bomb-making. (Throckmorton) stated that he believes that the suspect knows what he is doing and is capable of making a bomb,” according to the police report.

Police then went to Warner’s home, but he did not answer when they knocked on his door. They could see the RV fenced off behind the house but could not see inside of the vehicle. Authorities also noted “several security cameras and wires attached to a alarm sign on the front door.”

“They saw no evidence of a crime and had no authority to enter his home or fenced property,” the MNPD spokesman said.

Shortly afterwards, the FBI reported back to Nashville police that they had “checked their holdings and found no records on Warner at all,” and the Defense Department said that “checks on Warner were all negative.”

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation said Monday that Warner had not been on their radar before the explosion.

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