News

Politics & Policy

National Pro-Life Group Announces $52 Million Election Effort

People at the March for Reproductive Freedom protest against the state’s new abortion law in Montgomery, Ala., May 19, 2019. (Michael Spooneybarger/Reuters)

One of the nation’s largest pro-life groups on Friday announced a $52 million campaign effort for the 2020 election cycle that will educate voters about “Democrats’ support for extreme pro-abortion policies.”

The Susan B. Anthony List and its partner super PAC, Women Speak Out PAC, said their campaign effort will involve deploying canvassers and digital ads as well as calling and mailing information to voters.

“The stakes of this election could not be higher. President Trump has governed as the most pro-life president in our nation’s history,” Mallory Quigley, national spokeswoman for the SBA List remarked to National Review. “Democratic leadership and their candidates refuse to support even protections for babies born alive after failed abortions. That’s horrific. We find voters who need to know and educate them about the difference between the two options. Once people understand what is at stake, we’ve seen an impact on enough voters to deliver a margin of victory to the pro-life candidate.”

Quigley added that the Democratic Party’s extreme position on abortion is “dramatically out of step with the majority of Americans and even people within their own party.”

“Abortion radicalism is a liability at the ballot box. We’ve seen the power of the life issue to persuade casual Democrat voters away from their pro-abortion candidates to the pro-life choice,” she said.

The group’s commitment surpasses that of Planned Parenthood, which has pledged $45 million to support presidential, congressional, and state-level candidates in 2020 who back abortion rights.

The SBA List said it has visited more than 4.6 million voters over the last three election cycles, including 460,000 voters in swing states already this cycle. The group has committed to four million total visits to voters before Election Day.

The group’s president, Marjorie Dannenfelser, was previously national chairwoman of the Trump administration’s Pro-life Coalition.

All 2020 contenders for the Democratic presidential nomination support abortion rights, although some stipulate they would support certain restrictions.

Former vice president Joe Biden, the current frontrunner, has evolved on abortion over the last few decades. He previously said Roe vs. Wade, the Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide, “went too far” but has since reversed his position, even saying he no longer supports a ban on government funding of abortion. Meanwhile, Senators Tulsi Gabbard and Amy Klobuchar have said they support some limits on third trimester abortions.

Most Popular

Elections

How Can Bernie Sanders Happen in America?

A number of pundits have recently argued that younger voters, especially those under 30, are less inclined to be bothered when they hear the word “socialism,” since they have no firsthand memory of the Cold War. To some extent, this must be true. Those who weren’t alive during socialism’s cruelest ... Read More
Elections

How Can Bernie Sanders Happen in America?

A number of pundits have recently argued that younger voters, especially those under 30, are less inclined to be bothered when they hear the word “socialism,” since they have no firsthand memory of the Cold War. To some extent, this must be true. Those who weren’t alive during socialism’s cruelest ... Read More
Elections

The Highest-Stakes Moment Brings the Worst Debate

Tonight’s debate would have been only marginally less incoherent, noisy, and grating to the ears if CBS had broadcast two hours of static. The last debate before the South Carolina primary featured so much shouting, you would think that the candidates had just been told their microphones weren’t working. ... Read More
Elections

The Highest-Stakes Moment Brings the Worst Debate

Tonight’s debate would have been only marginally less incoherent, noisy, and grating to the ears if CBS had broadcast two hours of static. The last debate before the South Carolina primary featured so much shouting, you would think that the candidates had just been told their microphones weren’t working. ... Read More