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NBC Unable to Confirm Key Details of Julie Swetnick’s Allegation

Julie Swetnick (via YouTube/MSNBC)

In preparing for an interview with Julie Swetnick that aired Monday evening, NBC News was unable to confirm key details of her account.

Swetnick, who has accused Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting girls at a series of high-school parties and being “present” during her gang rape at one such gathering, provided NBC News the names of four individuals who she said could corroborate her story.

“This morning, Swetnick provided four names of friends she says went to the parties with him. One of them says he does not recall a Julie Swetnick. Another of the friends she named is deceased. We reached out to the other two and haven’t heard back. Swetnick says after the alleged attack on her when she was 19, she never returned to those big house parties,” NBC News host Kate Snow said at the conclusion of the interview.

Snow also told viewers prior to the interview that parts of Swetnick’s account differed from what she described in her sworn statement.

Swetnick, when informed that NBC News was unable to find anyone who could place her at parties in suburban Maryland with Kavanaugh, maintained that the parties in question were well known in the area. She further told NBC that she reported her assault to the Montgomery County police department, but the officer whose name she provided is deceased and the department said it could take as long as one month to locate the relevant report.

After accusing Kavanaugh in her sworn statement of “spik[ing] the drinks of girls at house parties . . . with grain alcohol and/or drugs,” Swetnick backed off the claim during the interview, saying only that she saw Kavanaugh handing out cups of a presumably spiked beverage.

Kavanaugh has vigorously denied facilitating gang rapes in high school and said he does not know Swetnick. “This is ridiculous and from the Twilight Zone. I don’t know who this is and this never happened,” he said of Swetnick’s claims.

Swetnick is represented by Michael Avenatti, the California attorney who rose to prominence representing porn star Stormy Daniels in her lawsuit against President Trump. He has declined to provide the names of any witnesses who were party to Swetnick’s gang rape, according to NBC News.

Avenatti, who is considering entering the 2020 presidential election, has committed to preventing Kavanaugh’s confirmation on behalf of his client.

Pressed on whether she was concerned that her association with Avenatti would hurt her credibility, Swetnick said she was confident in her representation, whom she selected for his familiarity with Washington, D.C.

Avenatti lacks a license to practice law in Maryland and there is no record of his ever having been licensed to practice law in Washington, D.C.

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