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New York Times Quietly Retracts Claim That Hunter Biden Laptop Story Is ‘Unsubstantiated’

Hunter Biden attends an event in New Castle, Del., January 19, 2021. (Tom Brenner/Reuters)

The New York Times has revised its coverage of the New York Post’s Hunter Biden laptop story to reflect that it is not “unsubstantiated.”

In reporting on Monday about the Federal Election Commission’s (FEC) ruling that Twitter did not make an unlawful campaign contribution to Joe Biden by censoring the story last October, the Times used the “unsubstantiated” descriptor in spite of the wealth of evidence supporting, and dearth of evidence contradicting, the Post’s claims.

Earlier this year, CNN confirmed that authorities believe the laptop — which allegedly contained incriminating sexual content, as well as evidence of a meeting with a Ukrainian energy executive and then–vice president Joe Biden — referred to by the Post to be Hunter Biden’s. Moreover, Biden himself has speculated that it was “certainly possible” that it belongs to him.

“There could be a laptop out there that was stolen from me,” conceded the president’s son in April.

On Tuesday, a day after the Times broke the news about the FEC’s decision, and disparaged the Post’s reporting, it removed the “unsubstantiated” label. Notably, the change was not accompanied by an editor’s note or other acknowledgment of the original error.

The Post’s story alleged that Biden had left his laptop at a New Jersey repair shop, where it was later confiscated by federal authorities.

Twitter reversed its decision the day after the publishing of the Post article, and its CEO, Jack Dorsey, has called the initial decision a “mistake.”

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

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