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Over 50 Law Professors Pen Letter to Senate Judiciary in Support of Amy Coney Barrett’s Confirmation

Judge Amy Coney Barrett looks on during a meeting with Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) on Capitol Hill, September 30, 2020. (Sarah Silbiger/Pool via Reuters)

A group of more than 50 law professors sent a letter Friday to the Senate Judiciary Committee expressing their support for Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation to the Supreme Court and calling her qualifications “stellar.”

In a letter to Chairman Lindsey Graham and ranking Democratic member Dianne Feinstein, obtained by National Review, the 53 law signatories identified themselves as a “diverse” group representing many fields and perspectives and holding “widely differing views about the President and the timing of this nomination.”

“We share the belief, however, that Judge Barrett is exceptionally well qualified to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States, and we urge the Senate to confirm her as an Associate Justice,” the group wrote.

President Trump nominated Barrett last month to fill the Supreme Court seat of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, kicking off what is expected to be a tempestuous Senate confirmation battle less than six weeks before the November presidential election.

Barrett has served on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit since she was appointed by Trump in 2017. The 48-year-old Notre Dame law professor clerked for late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and is a conservative Catholic mother of seven.

“Although we have differing perspectives on the methods and conclusions in her scholarship, we all agree that her contributions are rigorous, fair-minded, respectful, and constructive,” the professors said in their letter. “Her work demonstrates a thorough understanding of the issues and challenges that federal courts confront.”

The group includes several professors from Ivy League schools including Harvard University, Columbia Law School, and Yale Law School, as well as professors from the University of San Diego, Notre Dame Law School, George Washington University Law School, Stanford Law School, and others.

“Judge Barrett has outstanding credentials for this position,” the law professors said in their letter to Graham and Feinstein, adding that, “as a legal scholar, Judge Barrett has distinguished herself as an expert in procedure, interpretation, federal courts, and constitutional law.”

“She enjoys wide respect for her careful work, fair-minded disposition, and personal integrity. We strongly urge her confirmation by the Senate,” the professors wrote.

The Judiciary Committee on Monday began its first day of hearings on Barrett’s nomination, which are expected to go through Thursday. Republicans are hoping to confirm her to the Court before the election on November 3.

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