News

White House

Police Disperse Protesters Outside White House as Trump Addresses the Nation

President Donald Trump delivers a statement in the Rose Garden at the White House on the ongoing protests in the wake of the death of George Floyd, June 1, 2020. (Tom Brenner/Reuters)

President Trump promised that he “will fight to protect” the nation in an address from the Rose Garden Monday night as protestors clashed with police less than a mile away amid nationwide protests stemming from the death of George Floyd.

“I am mobilizing all available federal resources, civilian and military, to stop the rioting and looting, to end the destruction and arson, and to protect the rights of law-abiding Americans, including your Second Amendment rights,” Trump stated in his address, adding that he was dispatching “thousands and thousands of heavily armed soldiers military personnel” to the nation’s capitol after widespread rioting. “These are not acts of peaceful protest. These are acts of domestic terror,” he warned.

“I will fight to protect you. I am your president of law and order, and an ally of all peaceful protestors,” the president stated.

Trump also proposed to invoke the Insurrection Act, a 19th century law that allows him to deploy the military domestically, if governors do not deploy “the National Guard in sufficient numbers that we dominate the streets.” Earlier Monday, Trump repeatedly told the nation’s governors to “dominate” the situation. Following his address, Illinois governor J. B. Pritzker said on CNN that it would be “illegal” for Trump to deploy troops. While use of the law is rare, then-president George H. W. Bush invoked the law in 1992 to send the military into Los Angeles during the Rodney King riots.

Trump ended his speech by saying he would go “pay respects” to a “very special place,” and then left the White House to walk over and make a visit to the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church — which was burned by rioters on Sunday night.

“Greatest country in the world. And we’re going to keep it safe,” Trump said — while posing for photos with a Bible.

Editor’s Note: A previous version of this article and a previous headline reported that tear gas was used to disperse protesters in Lafayette Park based on the accounts of numerous reporters on the ground. That detail has been removed since it is now unclear whether tear gas was in fact used. The Park Police, who served as the main force dispersing the rioters, issued a statement Tuesday evening in which they claim no tear gas was used. Instead, the Park Police claim they used “smoke canisters” and “pepper balls” to disperse the crowd. The Secret Service, who were also on scene when the rioters were driven from the park, have refused to say whether they deployed tear gas.

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Most Popular

Education

Destroy the ‘Public’ Education System

‘Public” schools have been a catastrophe for the United States. This certainly isn’t an original assertion, but as we watch thousands of authoritarian brats tearing down the legacies of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, it’s more apparent than ever. State-run schools have undercut two fundamental ... Read More
Education

Destroy the ‘Public’ Education System

‘Public” schools have been a catastrophe for the United States. This certainly isn’t an original assertion, but as we watch thousands of authoritarian brats tearing down the legacies of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, it’s more apparent than ever. State-run schools have undercut two fundamental ... Read More
Culture

Why Progressives Wage War on History

Princeton University’s decision to remove the name “Woodrow Wilson” from its School of Public and International Affairs is a big win for progressive activists, and the implications will extend far beyond the campus. It hardly surprises me, in today’s polarizing environment, that my alma mater caved to ... Read More
Culture

Why Progressives Wage War on History

Princeton University’s decision to remove the name “Woodrow Wilson” from its School of Public and International Affairs is a big win for progressive activists, and the implications will extend far beyond the campus. It hardly surprises me, in today’s polarizing environment, that my alma mater caved to ... Read More
Regulatory Policy

Going Medieval

Writing in Bloomberg, Noah Smith gives more than a nod to Peter Turchin’s theory of elite overproduction (or, as Smith neatly relabels the phenomenon, “elite over-competition”) as a cause of the current wave of turmoil in the West, something with which I would agree but, I think, more emphatically. Quite ... Read More
Regulatory Policy

Going Medieval

Writing in Bloomberg, Noah Smith gives more than a nod to Peter Turchin’s theory of elite overproduction (or, as Smith neatly relabels the phenomenon, “elite over-competition”) as a cause of the current wave of turmoil in the West, something with which I would agree but, I think, more emphatically. Quite ... Read More
Culture

Two NFL Apologies

So Drew Brees defended the American flag and all it stands for, said he didn’t agree with kneeling for the national anthem and correctly described this gesture of open disrespect as disrespect. "Is everything right with our country right now?" said the Saints' future Hall of Famer. "No, it is not. We still have ... Read More
Culture

Two NFL Apologies

So Drew Brees defended the American flag and all it stands for, said he didn’t agree with kneeling for the national anthem and correctly described this gesture of open disrespect as disrespect. "Is everything right with our country right now?" said the Saints' future Hall of Famer. "No, it is not. We still have ... Read More
U.S.

Bad News about the Virus

On the menu today: an important update about indications that the coronavirus is now more contagious than it used to be, with far-reaching ramifications for how we fight this pandemic; a point on the recent complaints about the Paycheck Protection Program; and a new book for everyone closely following the debate ... Read More
U.S.

Bad News about the Virus

On the menu today: an important update about indications that the coronavirus is now more contagious than it used to be, with far-reaching ramifications for how we fight this pandemic; a point on the recent complaints about the Paycheck Protection Program; and a new book for everyone closely following the debate ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Chesterton’s Cops

Conservatives are big on “Chesterton’s fence.” That’s G. K. Chesterton’s principle that you cannot reform what you do not understand, that you should not for the sake of convenience knock down a fence until you understand why it was put up in the first place. When encountering a fence in his way, ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Chesterton’s Cops

Conservatives are big on “Chesterton’s fence.” That’s G. K. Chesterton’s principle that you cannot reform what you do not understand, that you should not for the sake of convenience knock down a fence until you understand why it was put up in the first place. When encountering a fence in his way, ... Read More
Culture

A Triumph at Mount Rushmore

If nothing else, President Donald Trump’s July Fourth speech at Mount Rushmore clarified the battle lines of our culture war. The New York Times called the speech “dark and divisive,” while an Associated Press headline declared, “Trump pushes racial division.” A Washington Post story said the speech ... Read More
Culture

A Triumph at Mount Rushmore

If nothing else, President Donald Trump’s July Fourth speech at Mount Rushmore clarified the battle lines of our culture war. The New York Times called the speech “dark and divisive,” while an Associated Press headline declared, “Trump pushes racial division.” A Washington Post story said the speech ... Read More