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Senate Sends Budget Deal to Trump’s Desk

President Donald Trump behind the Resolute Desk at the White House in Washington, D.C., July 26, 2019. (Leah Millis/Reuters)

The Senate on Thursday passed a two-year budget and debt-ceiling deal, sending the bill to President Trump, who has indicated that he will sign it.

The bill, which passed 67 to 28 with bipartisan support, is projected to add approximately $1.7 trillion to the deficit over the next ten years. It will lift the debt ceiling until 2021, set a $1.37 trillion limit on agencies’ annual budgets for fiscal year 2020, and raise that limit in fiscal year 2021. It will also essentially end the automatic spending cuts put in place by the 2011 Budget Control Act.

Only 23 Republicans and five Democrats voted against the bill in the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Chuck Schumer had both urged its passage. The Democrat-controlled House passed the legislation last week in a 284 to 149 vote.

“This is the agreement the administration has negotiated, this is the deal the House has passed, this is the deal President Trump is waiting and eager to sign into law, this is the deal that every member of this body should support when we vote later this morning,” McConnell said before the vote.

Schumer said the deal “will strengthen our national security and provide our troops with the resources they need to do a very difficult and often dangerous job. And it will clear the way for critical investments for those in the middle class.”

On Twitter, Trump threw his support behind the deal as well, telling the GOP that it can worry about cutting spending later.

The U.S. government is currently over $22 trillion in debt, a fact some of the bill’s Republican opponents raised during debate. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky, known for his fiscally conservative approach to budgeting, said the bill “marks the death of the tea party in America.”

“Both parties have deserted, have absolutely and utterly deserted America and show no care and no understanding and no sympathy for the burden of debt they are leaving the taxpayers, the young, the next generation, and the future of our country,” Paul said.

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