News

U.S.

Suspect in Shooting of Two Louisville Police Officers Identified

Louisville Police secure the area after 2 police officers were shot during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky, September 23, 2020. (Lawrence Bryant/Reuters)

The suspect accused of shooting two Louisville, Ky. police officers during protests Wednesday night has been identified by the Louisville Metro Police Department.

Larynzo Johnson, 26, was arrested Wednesday and has been charged with assault of a police officer and wanton endangerment. He will be arraigned on Friday.

Johnson “intentionally used a handgun to fire multiple bullets at officers” who were at the scene of protests downtown that erupted in response to the state attorney general’s decision to charge only one of the police officers who fatally shot Breonna Taylor. Police said witnesses observed Johnson firing at officers before fleeing the scene, and video of the incident obtained by law enforcement showed him shooting a handgun in the direction of police. Johnson was also in possession of a handgun when he was arrested, the complaint filed in Jefferson County said.

Two Louisville police officers were shot and sustained serious injuries. One of the officers was in surgery Wednesday night.

Earlier on Wednesday, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s office announced first-degree wanton endangerment charges against one of the officers who shot into the house where Taylor, a black 26-year-old emergency medical worker, was killed on March 13. The officer was not charged with murder, and the other two officers involved in the fatal shooting were not charged.

Taylor was shot eight times in her apartment as Louisville police officers executed a search warrant for two men who were known to reside there. The officers who shot her were not charged. The warrant was issued because police suspected that a man connected to a drug ring was receiving packages containing drugs at Taylor’s apartment, but no drugs were found in the raid.

Protesters “set fires, caused property damage and failed to disperse after being warned,” according to the complaint. Demonstrators also looted several businesses and climbed on top of city vehicles, police said. Nearly 100 protesters were arrested during the protests.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer declared a state of emergency on Tuesday “due to the potential for civil unrest” as the city braced for the grand jury decision on charges against the officers. The mayor also implemented a three-day countywide 9p.m. curfew.

Protests also broke out Wednesday night in Atlanta, New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C.

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Most Popular

Elections

How Trump Should Approach the Final Debate

The so-called mainstream polls of the swing states show the race narrowing. If the trend continues at the current rate, President Trump could poll even in two weeks—in addition to the “other” polls that show him near there already. So Trump’s mission at the final debate on Thursday is to continue to ... Read More
Elections

How Trump Should Approach the Final Debate

The so-called mainstream polls of the swing states show the race narrowing. If the trend continues at the current rate, President Trump could poll even in two weeks—in addition to the “other” polls that show him near there already. So Trump’s mission at the final debate on Thursday is to continue to ... Read More
Politics & Policy

A Bizarre and Revealing Biden Interview

William Voegeli of the Claremont Review of Books brought up a strange Joe Biden interview from 1974 I hadn't seen before in which Biden emerges as arrogant and determined to make more money, one way or another. Biden also speaks of his first wife Neilia, who had died two years earlier, in unusually frank ways: ... Read More
Politics & Policy

A Bizarre and Revealing Biden Interview

William Voegeli of the Claremont Review of Books brought up a strange Joe Biden interview from 1974 I hadn't seen before in which Biden emerges as arrogant and determined to make more money, one way or another. Biden also speaks of his first wife Neilia, who had died two years earlier, in unusually frank ways: ... Read More

The Pollster Who Thinks Trump Is Ahead

The polling aggregator on the website RealClearPolitics shows the margin in polls led by Joe Biden in a blue font and the ones led by Donald Trump in red. For a while, the battleground states have tended to be uniformly blue, except for polls conducted by the Trafalgar Group. If you are a firm believer only in ... Read More

The Pollster Who Thinks Trump Is Ahead

The polling aggregator on the website RealClearPolitics shows the margin in polls led by Joe Biden in a blue font and the ones led by Donald Trump in red. For a while, the battleground states have tended to be uniformly blue, except for polls conducted by the Trafalgar Group. If you are a firm believer only in ... Read More
Media

The Unseemly Urge to Excuse Jeffrey Toobin

Jeffrey Toobin, legal analyst for CNN and The New Yorker, was suspended from his jobs and subjected to a round of public mockery for visibly exposing himself while masturbating on a Zoom call with New Yorker colleagues. The call was designed to role-play post-election scenarios for a contested election; Toobin ... Read More
Media

The Unseemly Urge to Excuse Jeffrey Toobin

Jeffrey Toobin, legal analyst for CNN and The New Yorker, was suspended from his jobs and subjected to a round of public mockery for visibly exposing himself while masturbating on a Zoom call with New Yorker colleagues. The call was designed to role-play post-election scenarios for a contested election; Toobin ... Read More
Media

Jeffrey Toobin and Our Public-Hate Ritual

Oh, Jeffrey Toobin — let him among us with a free hand cast the first stone. Toobin, a writer for The New Yorker and fixture on CNN, was participating in a role-playing exercise on a Zoom call with his magazine colleagues, wargaming election-night scenarios. Toobin was standing in for the courts when he ... Read More
Media

Jeffrey Toobin and Our Public-Hate Ritual

Oh, Jeffrey Toobin — let him among us with a free hand cast the first stone. Toobin, a writer for The New Yorker and fixture on CNN, was participating in a role-playing exercise on a Zoom call with his magazine colleagues, wargaming election-night scenarios. Toobin was standing in for the courts when he ... Read More