News

World

Suspected Killer of French Jewish Woman Won’t Stand Trial Because He Was in ‘Psychotic State’ Due to Marijuana Use, Court Rules

The suspect in the killing of French Jewish doctor Sarah Halimi will not stand trial because he was high on marijuana and in a “psychotic state” at the time of the alleged murder, a French appeals court ruled on Thursday.

Kobili Traore, a Malian immigrant to France, allegedly beat Halimi for an hour while calling her a “demon” and shouting about “Allah” as police stood outside Halimi’s door. Traore then threw Halimi from her third-story apartment. Halimi’s daughter has said Traore called her a “dirty Jewess” two years before he killed her mother.

French Jews were alarmed that authorities did not initially investigate the killing as a hate crime, and have accused police and mainstream media of sweeping the case under the rug. Antisemitism has risen in France in recent years, and around 40 percent of French Jews refrain from wearing religious symbols or garments in public.

The appeals court retained the designation of the incident as a “hate crime” in its indictment but decided it would not bring Traore to trial because, according to the ruling, he was not aware of his actions after he had smoked marijuana.

Traore “does appear to have voluntarily ended the life of Sarah Halimi,” the court wrote in its ruling. However, the court mandated Traore be hospitalized or be released to a drug rehabilitation program, and has ordered Traore to refrain from visiting the scene of the crime or from contacting the victim’s family.

The decision “marks the advent of a policy that gives impunity to anti-Semitic murder in France,” the French Jewish student association EUJF wrote on Twitter on Thursday.

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Zachary Evans is a news writer for National Review Online. He is a veteran of the Israeli Defense Forces and a trained violist.

Most Popular

Tired of ‘Winning’ Yet?

I’ve never really thought of Mark Steyn as a Palestinian suicide bomber before. You’ll want some context. Steyn, a wonderful writer and former National Review colleague, was filling in for Rush Limbaugh a few weeks ago, and he made the case for using antitrust law to bully technology platforms such as ... Read More

Tired of ‘Winning’ Yet?

I’ve never really thought of Mark Steyn as a Palestinian suicide bomber before. You’ll want some context. Steyn, a wonderful writer and former National Review colleague, was filling in for Rush Limbaugh a few weeks ago, and he made the case for using antitrust law to bully technology platforms such as ... Read More

The Need to Discuss Black-on-Black Crime

Thomas Abt’s book Bleeding Out (2019) has garnered a fair amount of attention for its proposals to deal with gun violence in mainly black urban neighborhoods. The entire focus of the book is on interventions in high-crime locations to stem the violence, including: hot-spots policing, working with young males at ... Read More

The Need to Discuss Black-on-Black Crime

Thomas Abt’s book Bleeding Out (2019) has garnered a fair amount of attention for its proposals to deal with gun violence in mainly black urban neighborhoods. The entire focus of the book is on interventions in high-crime locations to stem the violence, including: hot-spots policing, working with young males at ... Read More

Jason Isbell’s Alt-Alt-Country Masterpiece

There has long been a chasmic disconnect between the creators and the consumers of Americana music. The Americana songwriter still wants to be Woody Guthrie, but the Americana listener stopped being Tom Joad about 60 years ago. Americana — or alt-country, or folk, or whatever we’re calling it this week — ... Read More

Jason Isbell’s Alt-Alt-Country Masterpiece

There has long been a chasmic disconnect between the creators and the consumers of Americana music. The Americana songwriter still wants to be Woody Guthrie, but the Americana listener stopped being Tom Joad about 60 years ago. Americana — or alt-country, or folk, or whatever we’re calling it this week — ... Read More

Protesting Works. Rioting Doesn’t.

The tragic death of George Floyd on May 25 in Minneapolis has set off massive protests in the city and elsewhere. The protesters point to a video in which a police officer uses his knee to restrain Floyd, applying pressure to his neck for several minutes, as Floyd protests that he can’t breathe. This will ... Read More

Protesting Works. Rioting Doesn’t.

The tragic death of George Floyd on May 25 in Minneapolis has set off massive protests in the city and elsewhere. The protesters point to a video in which a police officer uses his knee to restrain Floyd, applying pressure to his neck for several minutes, as Floyd protests that he can’t breathe. This will ... Read More