News

Health Care

Texas Cities Concerned Coronavirus Cases Could Overwhelm Hospitals within Two Weeks

Hospital staff work at the United Memorial Medical Center’s intensive care unit amid the coronavirus pandemic in Houston, Texas, June 29, 2020. (Callaghan O'Hare/Reuters)

A number of Texas cities are warning that the level of hospitalized coronavirus patients they are experiencing could cause hospitals to run out of beds in as little as two weeks.

Officials in Austin, San Antonio, Houston, and Fort Worth have cautioned that their intensive-care units are on track to be overwhelmed as coronavirus cases continue to rise rapidly across the state.

Texas hit a new high on Sunday of 8,181 people hospitalized for the coronavirus. Texas still has more than 13,000 available staffed hospital beds, including more than 1,200 available staffed ICU beds, but some cities are approaching capacity more quickly than other regions.

In Houston, coronavirus hospitalizations have risen 44 percent over the past week, and mayor Sylvester Turner said the area’s hospital system could be in “serious trouble” in two weeks if the spread of the virus is not controlled.

“The number of people who are getting sick and going to the hospitals has exponentially increased. The number of people in our ICU beds has exponentially increased,” Turner said. “In fact, if we don’t get our hands around this virus quickly, in about two weeks our hospital system could be in serious, serious trouble.”

Austin mayor Steve Adler said the situation is potentially more dire in his city, warning that hospital intensive-care units could be at capacity between the next ten days to two weeks if the current rate of hospitalized patients continues.

“Hopefully we will see that trajectory slow, and we will know whether or not that happens this week,” Adler told the Austin American-Statesman, adding that of Austin’s 1,500 hospital beds designated for coronavirus patients, 446 were in use Saturday night. Hospitalizations in Austin have risen 34 percent during the last week.

Meanwhile, the Dallas-Fort Worth region has seen a 21 percent increase in coronavirus hospitalizations over the past week, and area hospitals are on track to reach capacity in three weeks, health experts warn.

Texas, which reopened most of its economy in recent weeks, has seen cases of the virus rise an additional 45,000 during the last week. Governor Greg Abbot on Thursday signed an executive order requiring most Texas residents to wear a face mask in public and has reversed several of his reopening measures, including ordering bars to shut down again.

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Most Popular

Why Trump’s Losing

President Trump pulled an inside straight to win in 2016, and now he needs another one. The good news for Trump is that his approval rating has stopped falling recently. The bad news is that it has stabilized in the low 40s. Election-watcher Harry Enten points out that no president since Harry Truman has won ... Read More

Why Trump’s Losing

President Trump pulled an inside straight to win in 2016, and now he needs another one. The good news for Trump is that his approval rating has stopped falling recently. The bad news is that it has stabilized in the low 40s. Election-watcher Harry Enten points out that no president since Harry Truman has won ... Read More
Elections

Ilhan Omar’s Got a Little Competition

Ilhan Omar, the Democratic U.S. congresswoman from Minnesota’s fifth congressional district, has been described as a “rising star” of the progressive movement and as President Donald Trump’s “worst nightmare.” So she surely did not expect to face much opposition during her reelection campaign. ... Read More
Elections

Ilhan Omar’s Got a Little Competition

Ilhan Omar, the Democratic U.S. congresswoman from Minnesota’s fifth congressional district, has been described as a “rising star” of the progressive movement and as President Donald Trump’s “worst nightmare.” So she surely did not expect to face much opposition during her reelection campaign. ... Read More
Politics & Policy

What Next?

Imagine this: You have a friend who has never saved a penny for his retirement. You ask him about it when he is in his twenties, and he says, “No problem — I’m going to win the lottery.” Years go by. You ask him about it in his thirties, in his forties, in his fifties, etc., and get the same answer. At ... Read More
Politics & Policy

What Next?

Imagine this: You have a friend who has never saved a penny for his retirement. You ask him about it when he is in his twenties, and he says, “No problem — I’m going to win the lottery.” Years go by. You ask him about it in his thirties, in his forties, in his fifties, etc., and get the same answer. At ... Read More