News

Immigration

Trump Administration to Crack Down on Visa Applicants Who Would Rely on Public Services

Over 5,000 immigrants wave U.S. flags after taking the oath of citizenship during a naturalization ceremony in Los Angeles, Calif., April 16, 2013. (Lucy Nicholson/Reuters)

The Department of Homeland Security released a new regulation on Monday that would severely limit the number of impoverished migrants eligible to enter and remain in the U.S. legally by requiring that visa applicants not be reliant on public services.

Under the expanded public-charge rule, which was added to the Federal Register on Monday, the authorities will consider an immigrant’s use of non-cash government-assistance programs, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Medicaid, as a negative factor in determining their eligibility for a green card or temporary visa.

Since 1996, the public-charge rule has only applied to cash-assistance programs such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and the Supplemental Security Income program.

The rule change will affect those migrants seeking to enter the U.S. and those who entered the country illegally but wish to obtain legal status. DHS officials will take into account would-be immigrants’ education, skills, employment history, health, and a number of other factors to determine whether they are likely to become dependent on the government.

Immigrant-rights advocates argue that the rule change will force needy families to choose between much-needed public services and their desire to secure lawful permanent residency.

The looming threat of the rule change, which was first proposed in October 2018, led one in seven adults in immigrant families to forego public services, according to a study by the Urban Institute.

White House adviser Steven Miller led the rule-change effort and was aided by the elevation of Ken Cuccinelli to director of United States Citizenship and Immigration Services earlier this year, according to the New York Times.

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Most Popular

Education

Science, Coronavirus, and Notre Dame

A few weeks back, the University of Notre Dame outlined its plan for reopening campus in the fall, detailing the way in which the administration hopes to bring students back to South Bend to resume in-person classes. Like the overwhelming majority of colleges and universities in the U.S., Notre Dame shifted all ... Read More
Education

Science, Coronavirus, and Notre Dame

A few weeks back, the University of Notre Dame outlined its plan for reopening campus in the fall, detailing the way in which the administration hopes to bring students back to South Bend to resume in-person classes. Like the overwhelming majority of colleges and universities in the U.S., Notre Dame shifted all ... Read More
Elections

How Important Are Political Conventions?

Welcome to week eleven of life with the coronavirus pandemic. If someone is asking “Why aren’t people staying inside like they did before?” it means they are in denial of the fact that this is week eleven of life with the coronavirus pandemic. On the menu today: wondering just how either party can safely ... Read More
Elections

How Important Are Political Conventions?

Welcome to week eleven of life with the coronavirus pandemic. If someone is asking “Why aren’t people staying inside like they did before?” it means they are in denial of the fact that this is week eleven of life with the coronavirus pandemic. On the menu today: wondering just how either party can safely ... Read More