News

National Security & Defense

Trump Trades Barbs With European Council President Ahead of NATO Summit

Flags of NATO countries fly during a ceremony at the alliance’s new headquarters in Brussels, May 25, 2018. (Christian Hartmann / Reuters)

President Trump traded barbs with European Council President Donald Tusk on the eve of Wednesday’s NATO summit in Brussels.

“The U.S. is spending many times more than any other country in order to protect [Europe.] Not fair to the U.S. taxpayer,” Trump wrote on Twitter, accusing  the European Union of having a $151 billion trade deficit with the U.S.


“US doesn’t have and won’t have a better ally than EU,” Tusk said in a message  addressed directly to the U.S. president.


“NATO countries must pay MORE, the United States must pay LESS. Very Unfair!” Trump hit back moments after the EC chief’s comments.

“Dear America, appreciate your allies. After all you don’t have that many,” the former Polish prime minister said as he signed a joint EU-NATO declaration with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg. “It is always worth knowing who is your strategic friend and who is your strategic problem.”

“Please remember this tomorrow when we meet at the NATO summit, but above all when you meet President (Vladimir) Putin in Helsinki,” he urged.

Trump said as he left the White House Tuesday morning that his first official summit with Putin “may be the easiest” of all the meetings he has planned for his week in Europe.

The president griped previously on Monday about European countries spending much less on NATO than the U.S., saying it is “not fair, nor is it acceptable.”

Most Popular

Culture

Road Trip

EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is Jonah Goldberg’s weekly “news”letter, the G-File. Subscribe here to get the G-File delivered to your inbox on Fridays. Dear Reader (Especially future contributors to my GoFundMe page), I am currently in the passenger seat of our family fun mobile, passing mile marker ... Read More
Books

The Maker of Middle-earth, in Gorgeous Detail

Oxford, England — After five months of ferocious and futile slaughter in “the Great War,” an Oxford undergraduate — knowing his deployment to the Western Front was inevitable — used his Christmas break in 1914 to cultivate his imagination. Twenty-two-year-old J. R. R. Tolkien began writing “The Story ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Answering my Critics

My post on Elizabeth Warren’s cynical/bonkers proposal to effectively nationalize every American firm with revenue of $1 billion or more has met with predictable criticism. I will address two points here. One, some have complained about the use of the word “expropriation,” or more broadly about ... Read More
Culture

Winslow Homer’s Art, through the Camera Lens

The Bowdoin College Museum of Art's show Winslow Homer and the Camera takes a perceptive, original look at one of America's great art visionaries. It's special for many reasons. It takes a much-considered artist — Homer (1836–1910) is among the gods atop the heap of American artists — and finally makes ... Read More