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Ukraine May Open an Investigation Into Alleged Biden Corruption

Joe Biden speaks at the 2019 Iowa Federation of Labor Convention in Altoona, Iowa, August 21, 2019. (Gage Skidmore)

The Ukrainian government may open an investigation into the corruption cases that President Trump cited during a July call with his Ukrainian counterpart Volodymyr Zelensky, according to the Daily Beast.

Trump has admitted that, during the phone call, he urged Zelensky to look into presidential candidate Joe Biden’s son, who was a board member of Ukrainian natural gas company Burisma Holdings from 2014 to early 2019.

Now several sources, including a Ukrainian member of parliament and government prosecutor, say that Ukraine will likely investigate the energy company as one part of a broader anti-corruption initiative.

The investigations were reportedly prompted by legislation that Zelensky signed this week as part of an effort to fight systemic corruption. The law, and resulting investigation, will focus on reforming the prosecutorial system within Ukraine.

Ukrainian parliament member Valentin Nalyvaichenko told the Daily Beast that the investigations into Burisma will most likely on internal corruption within the company itself, rather than targeting Biden and his son directly, as Trump urged.

Burisma was founded by Ukraine’s former minister of natural resources Mykola Zlochevsky, who is accused of paying to curtail investigations into the methods he used to obtain gas licenses.

Zelensky will meet with Trump at the U.N. General Assembly, where on Tuesday Trump confirmed to reporters that he ordered his administration to withhold a military aid package marked for Ukraine. This fact, coupled with Trump’s admission that he urged Zelensky to investigate Biden’s connection to Burisma, has sparked accusations that Trump improperly used his office to pressure a foreign leader for help with attacking a political opponent.

A growing number of congressional Democrats have voiced support for impeaching Trump if this quid pro quo is established.

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Zachary Evans is a news writer for National Review Online. He is a veteran of the Israeli Defense Forces and a trained violist.

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