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Women’s March Leader Claims Questions about Anti-Semitism Were Racist

Linda Sarsour and Tamika Mallory, leaders of the Women’s March, walk during the 2019 Women’s March in Washington, D.C., January 19, 2019. (Joshua Roberts/REUTERS)

Women’s March co-chair Tamika Mallory claimed during a recent interview that The View’s Meghan McCain aggressively questioned her about her ties to infamous anti-Semite Louis Farrakhan because McCain is racist.

McCain interrogated Mallory on The View last week about her past description of Farrakhan as the “GOAT” or “greatest of all time.”

Mallory, who labeled Farrakhan the GOAT on social media after attending a speech in which he labeled Jews “satanic,” said she intended to praise the Nation of Islam leader’s past advocacy on behalf of the black community, not his virulent and frequently displayed anti-Semitism.

Asked by McCain to explicitly condemn Farrakhan, Mallory refused — a decision she now attributes to McCain’s aggressive rhetorical style, which she claims was racially motivated.

“Because Meghan McCain asked six questions at once, she never stopped to allow me to answer any,” Mallory claimed during a recent appearance on the digital program Roland Martin Unfiltered. “But the nerve of people to believe that because she did all that, that I was supposed to just answer her as she said, so, so, ‘Massa, you get to tell me how to respond’? That’s not going to happen.”

“If people can’t understand the implications of a white woman yelling at me and trying to badger me into saying what she says — even if I wanted to say it, I wouldn’t have said it [in] the way in which she was speaking to me,” she added.

The Women’s March, which held its third annual demonstration in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, lost the support of more than half of its former partner organizations over the past year due to increased media scrutiny of its leadership’s endorsement of anti-Semitic conspiracy theories and ties to Farrakhan.

Following Mallory’s appearance on The View, the Democratic National Committee, Emily’s List, and a host of other prominent progressive groups that had sponsored the annual march in past years were removed from the list of sponsors on the Women’s March website.

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