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YouTube Terminates Channel of Firearms Parts Retailer

(Dado Ruvic/Reuters)

YouTube suddenly terminated the channel for the firearms parts company Brownells, the company claimed on Saturday.

“Brownells’ YouTube channel has been terminated without warning or notice,” Brownells’ Twitter account stated.

The 80-year-old gun supplies company reached out to followers on social media, asking them to contact Google, which owns YouTube, about the decision.

“If you’re opposed to the attacks on our communitys 1st & 2nd Amendment rights, please contact Google,” Brownells said.

Brownells used their YouTube channel to post instructional videos on how different guns work and how to assemble and maintain firearms.

Comments on social media were mostly critical of the move, many users saying Brownells is the wrong entity to go after to prevent gun violence.


Powerful advertising platforms like Google, Facebook, and Twitter have come under fire recently from Second Amendment advocates for apparent censorship of gun-related content. Even products meant to increase gun safety, such as ZORE’s highly-rated gun safety lock, have seen their advertisements censored, the internet platforms citing policies restricting ads for firearms sales.

Meanwhile, in the wake of deadly shootings around the country, the gun-control movement has lobbied Congress for tougher gun control and pressured companies and politicians to cut ties with the National Rifle Association. Dick’s Sporting Goods announced it will no longer sell assault weapons.

In particular, the February school shooting in Parkland, Florida that took 17 lives renewed a passionate national debate about gun control and school safety.

Update Monday 10:53am: Brownells announced Monday morning on Twitter that their channel has been restored and thanked those who voiced support.

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