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National Review / Digital
Dan Quayle’s Second Act
He’s out of politics, but full of political wisdom

Dan Quayle goes to bat for Mitt Romney in Paradise Valley, Ariz., Dec. 6, 2011. (Ross D. Franklin/AP)



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Dan Quayle lost his Secret Service protection within weeks of leaving the vice presidency, almost two decades ago. People still stop him in airports — he has to stand in line and remove his belt and shoes at security checkpoints, just like the rest of us — but for the most part they leave him be. “They’re considerate,” he says. “They give me space.” Every now and then, when he doesn’t want to be recognized, he’ll put on a low-tech disguise: a baseball cap and sunglasses. He did it a year and a half ago, when he attended a tea-party rally. “I just wanted to stand in back and hear the speakers,” he says.

Quayle lives in Arizona now. So do his closest relatives: his mother and his three children, including Ben, the son who is now a first-term congressman in the Phoenix area. The former vice president represented Indiana in the House and Senate for a dozen years before George H. W. Bush picked him as a running mate in 1988. Yet he grew up mainly in Scottsdale. “For me, this is more home than Indiana,” says Quayle, who moved back permanently in 1996. “I love the climate here. If we could import the people of Indiana, it would be perfect.”


Contents
February 6, 2012    |     Volume LXIV, No. 2

Articles
  • Why Ron Paul appeals to the millennial generation.
  • MSNBC drops the mask.
  • Rating agencies certify the euro zone’s parlous state.
  • Candidates, Americans, and their foreign languages.
  • Stephen Colbert’s NPR LOL.
Features
Books, Arts & Manners
  • Ron Haskins reviews Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960–2010, by Charles Murray.
  • Henry Olsen reviews Rule and Ruin: The Downfall of Moderation and the Destruction of the Republican Party, from Eisenhower to the Tea Party, by Geoffrey Kabaservice.
  • John J. Miller reviews Ambrose Bierce: The Devil’s Dictionary, Tales, & Memoirs, edited by S. T. Joshi.
  • Mark Falcoff reviews But What Do You Actually Do?: A Literary Vagabondage, by Alistair Horne.
  • Ross Douthat reviews The Artist.
  • John Derbyshire tours the Guggenheim.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
The Bent Pin  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .