Google+
Close
National Review / Digital
Socialism Is Back
And it’s in your face

(Darren Gygi)



Text  


‘Socialism” is a word that has vexed thoughtful conservatives since 2008, along with the related terms “Marxist,” “radical,” and the whole nomenclature of leftish extremism. In his painstakingly documented book Radical-in-Chief: Barack Obama and the Untold Story of American Socialism, Stanley Kurtz dwells at great and profitable length on the president’s connections, and his coterie’s connections, with avowedly socialist and radical organizations. Glenn Beck, Jonah Goldberg, and other observers have with varying degrees of rigor pursued related lines of inquiry, locating affinities between Obama’s clique, along with mainstream Democrats more broadly, and the sinister fringe. The Left’s response to these investigations has ranged from the insane (e.g., Lewis Diuguid arguing in the Kansas City Star that “socialist” is a codeword for “black”) to the inane, protesting that “socialist” is being used as a mere smear word, empty of other content. The Left knows whereof it speaks, having spent half of the 20th century describing its critics as “fascists,” with no regard for the meaning of that word. (Goldberg’s deft reversal in Liberal Fascism, reconnecting contemporary progressivism with its pre-war authoritarian models, took away that rhetorical toy and thereby produced a symphony of delicious caterwauling from left-wing critics, one or two of whom may even have read the book.)

“Americans have no clue what socialism is,” declared the noted political philosopher Bill Maher during a seminar with the equally cerebral Larry King. Rep. Anthony Weiner used almost precisely the same words, thundering at a critic: “You don’t know what socialism means.” Conservatives should pay some careful attention to the formal meaning of socialism, because it is vital that we recognize it, understand it — and contain it. While Mr. Kurtz is right to worry about the radicalism of President Obama and his lieutenants, it is not “the untold story of American socialism” that most threatens our nation, but the told story. It is not hidden socialism that presently undermines our institutions, weakens our economy, and fritters away both present and future prosperity, but unhidden socialism. A sharpened definition of socialism, made more precise and reflecting the conditions of the 21st century rather than those of the 19th, is a necessary tool for understanding our current political crisis, and what follows are some notes toward a more relevant definition of socialism.


Pages

Contents
January 24, 2011    |     Volume LXIII, No. 1

Articles
  • Evicting the president in 2012 will not be easy.
  • Strategy and tactics for the new House majority.
  • Our economy and culture would benefit from its remembrance.
  • The Khodorkovsky trial exposes the ugly truth of Putin’s Russia.
  • In memoriam.
Features
Books, Arts & Manners
  • Glenn Harlan Reynolds reviews Gray Lady Down: What the Decline and Fall of the New York Times Means for America, by William McGowan.
  • Claire Berlinski reviews The Arab Lobby: The Invisible Alliance that Undermines America’s Interests in the Middle East, by Mitchell Bard.
  • Helen Rittelmeyer reviews Pathology of the Elites: How the Arrogant Classes Plan to Run Your Life, by Michael Knox Beran.
  • Ryan T. Anderson reviews Origins: How the Nine Months Before Birth Shape the Rest of Our Lives, by Annie Murphy Paul.
  • Ross Douthat reviews The King's Speech and True Grit.
  • John Derbyshire fills a hole.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Editorial  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .