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Green Shift
How to Think Seriously about the Planet: The Case for an Environmental Conservatism, by Roger Scruton (Oxford, 457 pp., $29.95)


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This review should begin with a confession: I badly underestimated Roger Scruton.

When I heard two years ago that Scruton was coming to the American Enterprise Institute to write a book about a conservative view of environmentalism, I was skeptical. Though I had long been a fan of his philosophical books, I didn’t think his body of work well suited to a tackling of environmentalism. My skepticism deepened when I discussed his project with him: In addition to describing an approach that sounded unpromising, he seemed unfamiliar with many of the major figures and prominent features of the environmental debate of the last 40 years. After a long conversation, I sent him from my office with a large stack of key books, recommending that he “might look at” a few of them.


Contents
August 13, 2012    |     Volume LXIV, NO. 15

Articles
Features
Books, Arts & Manners
  • Steven Hayward reviews How to Think Seriously about the Planet: The Case for an Environmental Conservatism, by Roger Scruton.
  • Samuel R. Staley reviews Debacle: Obama’s War on Jobs and Growth and What We Can Do Now to Regain Our Future, by Grover G. Norquist and John R. Lott Jr.
  • Scott Winship reviews The Great Divergence: America’s Growing Inequality Crisis and What We Can Do About It, by Timothy Noah.
  • Florence King reviews Winter King: Henry VII and the Dawn of Tudor England, by Thomas Penn.
  • Ross Douthat reviews The Dark Knight Rises.
  • Richard Brookhiser offers Kerouacian haikus.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .