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Have Some Compassion
I write to express my disappointment at yet another paragraph in The Week devoted to transsexuals (March 25). If I recall correctly, this is the third such news bulletin that National Review has printed in recent months, and each time the Editors have offered an arguably snide and certainly unsympathetic comment on some unfortunate person — or child, in this instance.

I usually enjoy National Review’s sense of humor, and I don’t dispute the Editors’ right to reflect however they wish on whatever subject they choose, but I do find it puzzling that the choice is so frequently the transgendered and that these reflections are unfailingly dismissive and unkind. This is beneath a publication with strong Catholic roots and a deserved reputation for incisive and educated analysis.

Those who struggle with perhaps the most fundamental identity of all, that of gender, should receive our deep sympathy and efforts at understanding. Can we imagine that anyone would consider such an extreme remedy as a sex change unless he or she were experiencing deep pain and a conflict between mind and body that the rest of us cannot even comprehend? We should think seriously and compassionately about a six-year-old such as Coy who is grappling with such a profound problem at such a young age, and Coy’s parents, who are themselves deserving of commendation for appreciating their child’s dilemma, even if they are wrong in not appreciating that of the school.

Jesus cautioned us not to judge others, but rather to do unto them as we would wish done unto us. Most assuredly, I would not wish to receive the cavalier treatment that National Review has offered Coy and Coy’s family. Would the Editors wish their own personal struggles to be publicly visited with such scorn? As a wise pastor once said, “Too often Christians nail others to the cross, rather than going to the cross for them.” That is a thought worth remembering before further comment is made on those we disagree with or do not understand.

Karen Amrhein
Baltimore, Md.

Solving the Everyday Problem
Kevin D. Williamson, in his article “The Everyday Problem” (March 25), completely ignores a major contributor to traffic congestion: one person per car.

Yes, there are commuter lanes on some roads, but they are lightly used. There is no real incentive for people to group together. The only possible solution is to charge cars with only one occupant a toll (additional for toll roads) at entries to major roads.

Henry Mulkiewicz
Monmouth Junction, N.J.


Contents
April 22, 2013    |     Volume LXV, No. 7

Articles
Features
  • On the many splendors of Canada’s tar sands.
  • The euro zone signals that bank deposits are not safe.
Books, Arts & Manners
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .