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Bad Artists Steal, Too
In mentioning the works George Lucas “borrowed and repurposed” in the making of Star Wars, Ross Douthat omits the films of Japan’s Akira Kurosawa — but I forgive him, because he is so spot-on in his criticism of Star Trek: Into Darkness and its director, J. J. Abrams (“To Boldly Flunk,” June 17).

Today’s filmmakers destroy planets and kill off leading characters as a means of getting from Point A to Point B. We used to call such ham-fisted plot devices “not having a better idea.”


Contents
July 15, 2013    |     Volume LXV, No. 13

Articles
Features
Books, Arts & Manners
  • Mackubin Thomas Owens reviews Gettysburg: The Last Invasion, by Allen C. Guelzo.
  • Yuval Levin reviews Edmund Burke: The First Conservative, by Jesse Norman and Edmund Burke in America: The Contested Career of the Father of Modern Conservatism, by Drew Maciag.
  • Arthur L. Herman reviews Moment of Battle: The Twenty Clashes That Changed the World, by James Lacey and Williamson Murray.
  • W. Bradford Wilcox reviews How the West Really Lost God: A New Theory of Secularization, by Mary Eberstadt.
  • Carrie Lukas reviews Men on Strike: Why Men Are Boycotting Marriage, Fatherhood, and the American Dream—and Why It Matters, by Helen Smith.
  • Richard Brookhiser discusses a life of changing technology.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .