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Twilight of the Confederacy
How Gettysburg changed history


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Looking back 20 years after it was fought, Alexander Stewart Webb declared that the Battle of Gettysburg “was, and is now throughout the world, known to be the Waterloo of the Rebellion.” Certainly Webb had earned the right to judge. He was in command of the Union brigade that absorbed the spearpoint of the battle’s climax on July 3, 1863, the great charge of the Confederate divisions commanded by George E. Pickett. “This three days’ contest,” Webb said, “was a constant recurrence of scenes of self-sacrifice,” especially “on the part of all engaged on the third and last day.”

One hundred fifty years later, one might imagine that Alexander Webb was suffering from a touch of middle-age myopia. The word “Gettysburg” is still powerful enough to be recognized by even the most indifferent grade-schooler as a big-box event in American history. But does it deserve to stand beside Waterloo?


Contents
July 15, 2013    |     Volume LXV, No. 13

Articles
Features
Books, Arts & Manners
  • Mackubin Thomas Owens reviews Gettysburg: The Last Invasion, by Allen C. Guelzo.
  • Yuval Levin reviews Edmund Burke: The First Conservative, by Jesse Norman and Edmund Burke in America: The Contested Career of the Father of Modern Conservatism, by Drew Maciag.
  • Arthur L. Herman reviews Moment of Battle: The Twenty Clashes That Changed the World, by James Lacey and Williamson Murray.
  • W. Bradford Wilcox reviews How the West Really Lost God: A New Theory of Secularization, by Mary Eberstadt.
  • Carrie Lukas reviews Men on Strike: Why Men Are Boycotting Marriage, Fatherhood, and the American Dream—and Why It Matters, by Helen Smith.
  • Richard Brookhiser discusses a life of changing technology.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .