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Sins and Commandments in Language
I was thinking that I was the only one bothered by the all-encompassing use of “inappropriate” to avoid an honest confession of sin. Even my pastor, a straight-talking preacher, succumbed to referring to a particular sinful action as an “inappropriate” one. Kevin D. Williamson wrote just about everything that I had been thinking with excellent examples (“The Inappropriate ‘Inappropriate,’” July 15).  Part of this misuse is prompted by the modern humanist view that there is no such thing as sin — wickedness, evil words or actions prohibited by the Ten Commandments. But the Ten Commandments have themselves become inappropriate, and this is one reason for our moral decline.

Theodore Siek
Pittsburgh, Pa.


Contents
August 19, 2013    |     Volume LXV, No. 15

Articles
Features
Books, Arts & Manners
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .