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National Review / Digital
Über-Survivor
Marko Feingold flourishes at 100
Marko Feingold, August 21, 2013 (Jay Nordlinger)


Text  


Salzburg – Marko Feingold has a very good memory. His memories begin in 1916, when he was three. The Feingold family lived in Vienna. There were four children, four boys, one of them a baby, Emil. Their father was off at war. Their mother habitually rose at 4 to stand in line for milk and bread. She took her ration card, and she took her baby. Women with babies got to the head of the line faster. That was important, because sometimes the city ran out of bread and milk.

It was cold in the winter, and the baby caught pneumonia and died. The way Marko Feingold puts it today is, “Three of us lived, because our brother died.” There was milk and bread for the children at home because their mother took the baby.


Contents
September 16, 2013    |     Volume LXV, No. 17

Articles
Features
Books, Arts & Manners
  • Florence King reviews Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson, by Jeff Guinn.
  • John Fonte reviews America 3.0: Rebooting American Prosperity in the 21st Century — Why America’s Greatest Days Are Yet to Come, by James C. Bennett and Michael J. Lotus.and Native Americans: Patriotism, Exceptionalism, and the New American Identity, by James S. Robbins.
  • Paul Marshall reviews Motherland Lost: The Egyptian and Coptic Quest for Modernity, by Samuel Tadros.
  • Jay Nordlinger discusses the Salzburg Festival.
  • Ross Douthat reviews In a World . . .
  • Richard Brookhiser discusses how a place achieves placehood.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .