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Prowling my hotel room the other night, I discovered a copy of the latest Vogue, kindly provided by the management. So, after bringing myself up to speed on Jennifer Lawrence — a “girl on fire,” apparently — I turned to a profile of Susan Rice. She was the girl sent to put out the fire, dispatched by the Obama administration to slog through all the Sunday talk shows the weekend after Benghazi and blame it on some video. In Sir Henry Wotton’s famous formulation, an ambassador is a man sent to lie abroad for the good of his country. In the case of Susan Rice, a U.N. ambassador is a broad sent to lie to her country for the good of her man — viz., Barack Obama. Happily, it worked. A year on, the director of the video is still in custody, and Miss Rice is now national-security adviser. So she and Vogue were in party mood:

“It’s a warm evening in June, and guests are assembling for a party she’s throwing in honor of LGBT Pride Month at the penthouse of the Waldorf Towers, the official residence of the U.N. Ambassador. Actress turned humanitarian activist Mia Farrow, wearing blue tinted glasses, is one of the first to arrive. Within minutes she’s joined by The New York Times’s executive editor, Jill Abramson . . .” And soon things are swinging: “They mingle and sip sparkling wine in the elegant living room next to a framed portrait of Oprah Winfrey and First Lady Michelle Obama resting their heads on Rice’s shoulders . . .”


Contents
September 16, 2013    |     Volume LXV, No. 17

Articles
Features
Books, Arts & Manners
  • Florence King reviews Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson, by Jeff Guinn.
  • John Fonte reviews America 3.0: Rebooting American Prosperity in the 21st Century — Why America’s Greatest Days Are Yet to Come, by James C. Bennett and Michael J. Lotus.and Native Americans: Patriotism, Exceptionalism, and the New American Identity, by James S. Robbins.
  • Paul Marshall reviews Motherland Lost: The Egyptian and Coptic Quest for Modernity, by Samuel Tadros.
  • Jay Nordlinger discusses the Salzburg Festival.
  • Ross Douthat reviews In a World . . .
  • Richard Brookhiser discusses how a place achieves placehood.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .