Google+
Close
National Review / Digital
Breakfast of Autocrats


Text  


If scientists discover that there is sufficient mass in the universe to slow its expansion and eventually cause all matter to collapse into one infinitely hot point in a hundred billion years, it will be Bush’s fault.

That’s just one of the things we’ve learned in the run-up to the Syrian stand-down, or whatever happens between the time this column is submitted and the time it ends up in your hands. It’s possible that Putin will float something that defuses the situation — say, Syria pretends to hand over its chemical weapons and the U.S. mothballs a carrier group. You’d like to think the president would say no. You fear he’d put his hand over the receiver and ask an aide, “Hey, how many of those do we have?”


Contents
September 30, 2013    |     Volume LXV, No. 18

Articles
Features
Special Women’s Section
  • Mothers with careers are improvising their own solutions.
  • Working-class women are saying no, to their detriment.
  • The GOP needs to reach unmarried women.
  • Why I gave up feminist activism.
Books, Arts & Manners
  • Daniel Hannan reviews The Passage to Europe: How a Continent Became a Union, by Luuk van Middelaar.
  • Max Boot reviews Small Wars, Faraway Places: Global Insurrection and the Making of the Modern World, 1945–1965, by Michael Burleigh.
  • Micah Mattix reviews Suitable Accommodations: An Autobiographical Story of Family Life: The Letters of J. F. Powers, 1942–1963, by J. F. Powers.
  • Betsy Woodruff reviews What Jefferson Read, Ike Watched, and Obama Tweeted: 200 Years of Popular Culture in the White House, by Tevi Troy.
  • Kelly Jane Torrance reviews Perilous Question: Reform or Revolution? Britain on the Brink, 1832, by Antonia Fraser.
  • Ross Douthat reviews The World’s End.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .