Google+
Close
National Review / Digital
Post-War Wars
Small Wars, Faraway Places: Global Insurrection and the Making of the Modern World, 1945–1965, by Michael Burleigh (Viking, 608 pp., $36)


Text  


Civilization in Asia and Africa is ancient, but the current political map of those continents is strikingly modern: It was largely drawn in the decade or two after World War II. Those were the years when new nations were forged. Burma, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, Malaya, Laos, Cambodia, Indonesia, Israel, Kuwait, Qatar, Ghana, Mali, Uganda, Nigeria, Congo, Kenya, Tanzania, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), and on and on — the list is a long one. Meanwhile, existing nations from Egypt to China saw changes of regime whose consequences continue to reverberate.

These revolutions had profound consequences for the West. The traditional great powers, Britain and France, lost much of their power and prestige, the loss of India (for Britain) and Algeria (for France) proving particularly traumatic. The United States and the Soviet Union sought to fill the vacuum in ways that embroiled them in brushfire wars — conflicts that proved particularly costly for the United States in the case of Vietnam and Korea and for the Soviet Union in Afghanistan.


Contents
September 30, 2013    |     Volume LXV, No. 18

Articles
Features
Special Women’s Section
  • Mothers with careers are improvising their own solutions.
  • Working-class women are saying no, to their detriment.
  • The GOP needs to reach unmarried women.
  • Why I gave up feminist activism.
Books, Arts & Manners
  • Daniel Hannan reviews The Passage to Europe: How a Continent Became a Union, by Luuk van Middelaar.
  • Max Boot reviews Small Wars, Faraway Places: Global Insurrection and the Making of the Modern World, 1945–1965, by Michael Burleigh.
  • Micah Mattix reviews Suitable Accommodations: An Autobiographical Story of Family Life: The Letters of J. F. Powers, 1942–1963, by J. F. Powers.
  • Betsy Woodruff reviews What Jefferson Read, Ike Watched, and Obama Tweeted: 200 Years of Popular Culture in the White House, by Tevi Troy.
  • Kelly Jane Torrance reviews Perilous Question: Reform or Revolution? Britain on the Brink, 1832, by Antonia Fraser.
  • Ross Douthat reviews The World’s End.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .