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Strictly Irrational
American Psychosis: How the Federal Government Destroyed the Mental Illness Treatment System, by E. Fuller Torrey (Oxford, 224 pp., $27.95)


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For Szasz as a polemicist I had a high regard, and I found him personally charming. I was impressed by the force of his character and convictions; but once, at a dinner party in London at the home of a mutual friend, I had a discussion with him that I thought showed that, like many idealists, he was more interested in the general than in the particular, and preferred to preserve his ideas pristine rather than sully them with the grubby or ambiguous nature of reality.

It so happened that I had been on duty the night before the dinner party as the doctor on call for a prison; and I had been called in the early hours of the morning to see a prisoner who had stripped naked, was talking loud gibberish, had smashed the light in his cell, and appeared to be trying to plug himself directly into the electricity.


Contents
October 14, 2013    |     Volume LXV, No. 19

Articles
Features
Books, Arts & Manners
  • Mary Eberstadt reviews Writing from Left to Right: My Journey from Liberal to Conservative, by Michael Novak.
  • Kevin A. Hassett reviews The Growth Experiment Revisited: Why Lower, Simpler Taxes Really Are America’s Best Hope for Recovery, by Lawrence B. Lindsey.
  • Colin Dueck reviews Conservative Internationalism: Armed Diplomacy under Jefferson, Polk, Truman, and Reagan, by Henry R. Nau.
  • Theodore Dalrymple reviews American Psychosis: How the Federal Government Destroyed the Mental Illness Treatment System, by E. Fuller Torrey.
  • Ross Douthat reviews Drinking Buddies.
  • Richard Brookhiser discusses the wall of sound.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Editorial  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .