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Whose Islam?


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On this side of the Atlantic, meanwhile, the Canadian branch of the Islamic Society of North America lost its charitable status after it was revealed to be funding all that jihad stuff that’s nothing to do with Islam. This presented a small problem for Justin Trudeau, leader of the Liberal party, son of Pierre, and on course to be the Queen’s dimmest prime minister of her six-decade reign: Where David Cameron is a silky, slippery deceiver who surely knows better, young Justin seems genuinely to believe the mush he serves up. Asked to explain his recent photo-op at the now-discredited ISNA, he replied: “Part of my job is to speak with as many Canadians as possible and talk to people about the kinds of shared values we have.”

I don’t suppose M. Trudeau really means he “shares values” with terrorism supporters, but he does get to the heart of the problem: To put it at its mildest, there seem to be insufficient “shared values” between Western societies and a not-insignificant number of young Muslim men who are nominally and legally citizens thereof. One survivor of the Westgate mall said, “I don’t understand why you would shoot a five-year-old child.” But what’s to understand? The child was shot because he was not Muslim. Five-year-olds died at All Saints’ Church for the same reason—because, even in a town that’s 99 percent Muslim, a non-Muslim kindergartner is a provocation. Crazy, huh? Yet it is not inconceivable that the man who executed the five-year-old at the Westgate mall was one of those “British subjects” or “U.S. citizens.” That’s to say, he’s not some primitive from the fringes of the map but someone who has grown up in the same society as Justin Trudeau and decided that Justin’s “shared values” are worthless.


Contents
October 14, 2013    |     Volume LXV, No. 19

Articles
Features
Books, Arts & Manners
  • Mary Eberstadt reviews Writing from Left to Right: My Journey from Liberal to Conservative, by Michael Novak.
  • Kevin A. Hassett reviews The Growth Experiment Revisited: Why Lower, Simpler Taxes Really Are America’s Best Hope for Recovery, by Lawrence B. Lindsey.
  • Colin Dueck reviews Conservative Internationalism: Armed Diplomacy under Jefferson, Polk, Truman, and Reagan, by Henry R. Nau.
  • Theodore Dalrymple reviews American Psychosis: How the Federal Government Destroyed the Mental Illness Treatment System, by E. Fuller Torrey.
  • Ross Douthat reviews Drinking Buddies.
  • Richard Brookhiser discusses the wall of sound.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Editorial  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .