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National Review / Digital
The E-Word
Thoughts on the use and abuse of ‘establishment’
John J. McCloy (AP)


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When we were schoolkids, we were taught that the longest word was “antidisestablishmentarianism.” Lately, I’ve been thinking that the most common word is “establishment” — as in “establishment Republican.” I read it every day, especially in the conservative press. I read it in virtually every article about politics, certainly in articles about the Republican party. And I find it nearly as empty and cheap as it is common.

At the end of October, a reporter for the Associated Press wrote, “The GOP is struggling to control tensions between its tea party and establishment wings and watching approval ratings sink to record lows.” Further on in his article, he reached for different language, to describe the same division. He spoke of “business-oriented Republicans and the GOP’s more ideological wing.” None of these words will quite do.


Contents
November 25, 2013    |     Volume LXV, No. 22

Articles
  • Our drift toward an imperial presidency.
  • Can he make it on the national level?
  • The scandal of Americans’ Third World net worth.
  • Thoughts on the use and abuse of ‘establishment.’
  • A report from Professor Hobsbawm’s memorial service.
Features
Books, Arts & Manners
  • James Rosen reviews The Kennedy Half-Century: The Presidency, Assassination, and Lasting Legacy of John F. Kennedy, by Larry J. Sabato, End of Days: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy, by James L. Swanson, and The Interloper: Lee Harvey Oswald Inside the Soviet Union, by Peter Savodnik.
  • James Piereson reviews JFK, Conservative, by Ira Stoll.
  • Ramesh Ponnuru reviews Abuse of Discretion: The Inside Story of Roe v. Wade, by Clarke D. Forsythe.
  • Thomas S. Hibbs reviews Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington, by Terry Teachout.
  • Ross Douthat reviews 12 Years a Slave.
Sections
The Long View  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Athwart  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Poetry  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  
Happy Warrior  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .