Phi Beta Cons

Dept. of Truly Horrible Ideas

CHE:

Public-policy researchers and university officials gathered at the American Enterprise Institute on Wednesday to debate the merits of a proposal in Congress to establish a U.S. Public Service Academy.
The proposed undergraduate institution would provide training specifically for public service, in addition to a traditional core curriculum in the arts and sciences. Upon graduation, students would have a five-year obligation to serve in public-service roles on a local, state, or national level. The admissions process would be rigorous, but students would not pay tuition to attend the institution, which would be federally subsidized. …
Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, Democrat of New York, introduced a bill to establish the academy in March 2007. The Senate bill (S 960) and a companion measure in the House of Representatives (HR 1671) have gained bipartisan support, but neither measure has advanced.

John J. Miller is the national correspondent for National Review and the director of the Dow Journalism Program at Hillsdale College. His new book is Reading Around: Journalism on Authors, Artists, and Ideas.

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