Phi Beta Cons

The Economic Crisis and Middle Eastern Studies

Martin Kramer, author of Ivory Towers on Sand: The Failure of Middle Eastern Studies in America, has a dark but realistic view of the probable effect of our current economic meltdown on the field. In an e-mail, wherein he spares neither President Bush nor Barack Obama, he writes:

A main implication [of the financial crisis] is that our universities will now be even more vulnerable to buy-outs by Middle East potentates. “Our” universities are ceasing to be American institutions anyway, as they “internationalize.” So the Bush legacy to Middle East studies will be (1) that unprecedented increase in Title VI just after 9/11 and (2) opening the academic floodgates to the Emiratis and Saudis. Gee, it sounds like just the sort of thing Obama might have done.

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Culture

New England Journal of Medicine Pushes Reparations

Reparations would grant African Americans government benefits not paid to other Americans to rectify the awful sin of slavery and the "peculiar institution's" residual harm. It is a favored policy of hard progressives, so of course, the New England Journal of Medicine -- which regularly promotes left-wing causes ... Read More
Culture

New England Journal of Medicine Pushes Reparations

Reparations would grant African Americans government benefits not paid to other Americans to rectify the awful sin of slavery and the "peculiar institution's" residual harm. It is a favored policy of hard progressives, so of course, the New England Journal of Medicine -- which regularly promotes left-wing causes ... Read More
Books

Three Cheers for the Quiet Ones

People often dismiss shy, quiet characters in literature. Readers prefer to identify with Jo March, Elizabeth Bennett, or Anne Shirley -- those delightful, bold, and charming characters who made a deep impression on us when we first encountered them. While there’s nothing wrong with emulating or admiring these ... Read More
Books

Three Cheers for the Quiet Ones

People often dismiss shy, quiet characters in literature. Readers prefer to identify with Jo March, Elizabeth Bennett, or Anne Shirley -- those delightful, bold, and charming characters who made a deep impression on us when we first encountered them. While there’s nothing wrong with emulating or admiring these ... Read More