Planet Gore

The Crushing Weight of My Predictive Powers

Climate Depot turned me on to a Guardian story today that only adds to the burden placed on me by my inerring prescience.

The Obama administration is softening up its European counterparts to accept the fact that he will not sign up to Kyoto II at Copenhagen; apologists insist that this really, really is rather different than his GOP predecessor — whose stance (somehow) was also really, really quite different from his Democratic predecessor — and are falling over themselves to explain it away. The important role that Congress plays in all of this has been rediscovered (after eight long years of being the Republican executive’s doing). And — oh by the way — the administration is plotting a Plan B of circumventing the Constitution’s treaty requirement by simply waving a wand and declaring Kyoto II to be not a treaty but an executive agreement (misstated as “executive order” in the piece).

Sound familiar to Planet Gore readers? If the truth weren’t that the global-warming activists and their cheerleaders are so easy to figure out, I’d say it’s time to go to Vegas and make profitable use of these prodigious prognosticatory powers, but our president has told us that’s a bad idea. I might end up using energy — like, say, some absurd Earth Day gesture or Air Force One boondoggle.

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