Planet Gore

Do Cyborgs Care about Global Warming?

Because if this guy’s prediction comes true, they better. Via Business Insider:

“Today there’s no legislation regarding how much intelligence a machine can have, how interconnected it can be. If that continues, look at the exponential trend. We will reach the singularity in the timeframe most experts predict. From that point on you’re going to see that the top species will no longer be humans, but machines.”

These are the words of Louis Del Monte, physicist, entrepreneur, and author of “The Artificial Intelligence Revolution.” Del Monte spoke to us over the phone about his thoughts surrounding artificial intelligence and the singularity, an indeterminate point in the future when machine intelligence will outmatch not only your own intelligence, but the world’s combined human intelligence too.

The average estimate for when this will happen is 2040, though Del Monte says it might be as late as 2045. Either way, it’s a timeframe of within three decades.

I’ll go out on a limb here and predict we won’t have a cyborg problem by 2045. Or 2145, for that matter. 

And there’s nothing in the article to suggest that Del Monte might be off by a few years — or centuries. But because he wrote a book and has a science degree, his ideas are given credibility. This robot-alarmism isn’t that much different from the climate-alarmism we’re currently enduring: a scary, titillating headline designed for clicks but nothing more than that.

Or maybe I’m wrong and we’ll soon face the dual threat of cyborgs and global warming. I bet their solutions to it will be smarter than the IPCC’s.

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